Deron Johnston – The North Grenville Times http://www.ngtimes.ca The Voice of North Grenville Thu, 11 Jan 2018 14:24:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 The Ticket for Rides http://www.ngtimes.ca/the-ticket-for-rides/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/the-ticket-for-rides/#respond Wed, 10 Jan 2018 19:20:42 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10479 On December 1, the Ontario Ministry of Transportation announced they would be releasing a total of $30 million in new funding for community transportation initiatives over the next five years. This new funding expands the pilot program launched in 2015, which was created to fund the development of community transportation solutions that address local transportation […]

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On December 1, the Ontario Ministry of Transportation announced they would be releasing a total of $30 million in new funding for community transportation initiatives over the next five years. This new funding expands the pilot program launched in 2015, which was created to fund the development of community transportation solutions that address local transportation needs, as well as finding ways to more efficiently use existing transportation resources.

The maximum grant that municipalities would be eligible for would be up to $500,000 for the current local transportation needs component. Also announced is a new component that could result in up to a one-time maximum of $1.5 million for creating long distance, inter-community bus services that would link communities across counties and regions.

For local community transportation projects, applicants (incorporated municipalities) must partner with at least one community organization with transportation resources. The community organization involved must be incorporated, and in operation for at least one year. In addition, at least one of the community organizations must already provide transportation services, have transportation resources, or both.

For long distance, inter-community bus service projects, applicants must show proof of support from municipalities that will be served by the service, in the form of official letters of support. Partnerships with other municipalities or community organizations aren’t necessary, but strongly encouraged.

This inter-community funding can also be used to expand or improve an existing transportation service. If certain groups of residents, such as the elderly, disabled persons, youth, or low-income residents aren’t properly serviced by an existing system, this money could be used to expand the system to properly service these groups. There’s also the potential to create transportation hubs and links to other transportation systems that would connect passengers safely and conveniently to all available services.

Back in June of this past year, the North Grenville Times created a survey on the potential of creating a transit system for Leeds and Grenville Counties. In that survey, 76% of respondents said they would like to see a transit system developed for Leeds and Grenville. 61% of respondents said they’d be comfortable with money for a transit system being in their municipal budget, but there was a wide range of responses on how much people felt that amount should be.

It’s safe to say that a transportation system for a lower-tier municipality like North Grenville is not sustainable. There’s probably not enough people who would use it to make it self-sustaining, so that, even with community partners, it would still rely heavily on municipal funding. What could be sustainable is a multiple-municipality partnership operated by a non-profit or charitable organization created by those municipalities. For example, one possibility is a Leeds and Grenville-wide transportation service that connects all municipalities within the two counties. There’s also the option of a Highway 43 corridor system that connects communities all along Highway 43, from Winchester to Smiths Falls, and would include Dundas, Grenville and Lanark Counties.

There are resources and funding available for a municipality to step forward and create a transportation system. It certainly wouldn’t be easy to pull a project like this together; but, with the right partners, they wouldn’t have to go it alone. We’ll know soon if anyone has that political will and vision, because the application deadline is February 28 at 5:00 pm.

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2018 North Grenville Wishlist http://www.ngtimes.ca/2018-north-grenville-wishlist/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/2018-north-grenville-wishlist/#respond Thu, 04 Jan 2018 19:57:40 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10412 For many people that I know, it seemed that 2017 was very difficult and challenging. Instead of looking at the coming year as a kind of “nowhere to go but up” situation, I look at it from the standpoint that, because of 2017, a lot of people learned difficult lessons, got stronger through overcoming adversity, […]

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For many people that I know, it seemed that 2017 was very difficult and challenging. Instead of looking at the coming year as a kind of “nowhere to go but up” situation, I look at it from the standpoint that, because of 2017, a lot of people learned difficult lessons, got stronger through overcoming adversity, and did a lot of heavy lifting to set the table for 2018. Keeping all of this in mind, I’m very optimistic for a “bounce-back” year in 2018.

The following list is a short compilation of items that would be great to see happen in 2018.

The renewal of Kemptville Campus. This was an easy one, right? What won’t be easy is to make this project a sustainable one that will provide direct economic benefit to residents and businesses in both the short-term and long-term. With so little information made available, it has been difficult, at best, to accept the “Trust us, this is gonna be great” position coming from municipal staff and council. What may become the most important decision (that residents may actually get some information about), is: who will be chosen by council to make up the Board of the non-profit organization that they have decided will guide this project. The project may very well succeed, or not succeed, based on the decisions of this Board (which may be limited by the conditions of the deal that they are given to work with by the municipality).

An overwhelming change in the composition of our municipal council in the next municipal election in October. We are in serious need of a culture change at the Municipal Centre. Municipal staff are often put in the unfortunate position of providing information and recommendations, and sometimes must make decisions (council must still vote on everything to make it official) because of a lack of leadership, strategic vision, and understanding of what is happening in their own community on the part of council. The current political culture of “if you don’t do anything, nothing can go wrong and you’ll get re-elected” is limiting, both our economic and social potential.

The quick completion of the Mental Health Hub at the Kemptville District Hospital. This past year saw the hospital searching for a Project Manager on a full-time temporary contract for the creation of a Mental Health Hub. There is a dire need for additional mental health services across Canada. As it stands, many North Grenville residents must either go to Brockville or Ottawa for their mental health care needs. This type of resource would be essential to the many people in need in the area.

The realization that agriculture, tourism, and local food represent significant opportunities as economic drivers for North Grenville, and that they need to be fostered and encouraged. There are existing people and businesses that can contribute to this, they should be brought together and consulted with to accomplish this. Creating a committee dedicated to this initiative would be a good start.

The acknowledgement that our young people are a wonderful asset, and that finding ways to cultivate them to become future leaders is not only a good idea, but essential for the long-term health of the community. Watching many of them leave North Grenville for post-secondary education and for better employment opportunities is like watching our future slowly evaporate in front of our eyes.

Some must learn to put aside personal grievances, pettiness, and selfish behaviours to work together to build a stronger community for everyone. There are still too many tiny castles and kings/queens that sometimes make it difficult to move forward with things that would benefit all of us. This simply must stop. Smaller municipalities are having enough difficulty dealing with external pressures and problems. When opportunities are missed or blocked because of these selfish people, we all lose.

All of these things are possible for us in 2018. In North Grenville, we are blessed with a strong volunteer base, a treasure chest full of human assets, and a spirit of generosity that other communities can only dream about. Simply put, when we work together, we can literally accomplish anything. Let’s make this the year that, while other communities around us may falter, we become what we’ve been hoping for.

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Is social enterprise the key to the future of local food? http://www.ngtimes.ca/social-enterprise-key-future-local-food/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/social-enterprise-key-future-local-food/#comments Wed, 20 Dec 2017 20:05:14 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10324 Recently, at the Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference in November, there was one breakout session that was of particular interest to this writer. It was a session on “The Role of Social Enterprise in Developing Sustainable Local Food Systems”. It was described as “this panel will profile the importance of social enterprises in building a […]

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Recently, at the Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference in November, there was one breakout session that was of particular interest to this writer. It was a session on “The Role of Social Enterprise in Developing Sustainable Local Food Systems”. It was described as “this panel will profile the importance of social enterprises in building a sustainable local food system by showcasing innovative business models and the impact they create”.

Three specific examples were introduced by a founder, a marketing executive, and an executive director. The first enterprise to be showcased was called Klink Coffee. It was created by the John Howard Society of Toronto, a not-for-profit organization. What’s unique about Klink, explained Mark Kerwin, is that it provides jobs and skills training for people returning from the criminal justice system. These people would normally find it very difficult to find employment with a criminal record. They currently sell their different blends of coffee online, but hope to expand to a café and storefront in 2018.

The second organization featured was the YWCA of Hamilton. Executive Director, Denise Christopherson, told the over-capacity crowd about turning around a café that was losing money for the YWCA. She outlined how her organization closed the café and opened a catering business called “At The Table”. It quickly became successful, so using the catering proceeds, they renovated and then re-opened the café. They almost exclusively employ women who are staying at the YWCA. The women gain work experience, employment skills, and small business experience, so that they can eventually go out to pursue their own careers, or open their own businesses.

The final presentation was from Brandon Hebor of Ripple Farms Inc., who had a unique process of aquaponics to tell everyone about. They use a metal shipping container filled with water and Tilapia (yes the fish) to somehow provide the energy needed to grow leafy vegetables in a greenhouse on top of the shipping container. It’s a truly remarkable process, and his organization has been asked to make presentations around the world about it. Brandon believes that, by using this process, there would, potentially, no longer be a need to ship produce thousands of kilometres, but instead it can be grown right here on Canadian soil using this system.

Most people are unaware of it, but the Two Rivers Food Hub in Smith’s Falls is a social enterprise that is managed by Kemptville resident Bruce Enloe. A fine example of the social enterprise model for local food, Two Rivers’ mandate is to support small and medium-sized farmers in and around Lanark, and Leeds and Grenville counties. Two Rivers offers a wide range of facilities and services for farmers and producers, such as a commercial kitchen for food processing, storage for root vegetables, and wholesale services (where they sell to restaurants and institutions what they buy from local farmers and producers) to name just a few.

With such a successful example as the Two Rivers Food Hub just down the road, and various other examples of successful and innovative social enterprises, it’s not difficult to imagine the significant impact that they could have in creating, solidifying, or enhancing a thriving local food system. What’s your idea?

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AMI Agri-food Workshop http://www.ngtimes.ca/ami-agri-food-workshop/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/ami-agri-food-workshop/#respond Wed, 13 Dec 2017 19:47:10 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10224 On December 6, the North Grenville Municipal Centre was the site of a special agri-food workshop hosted by the Agri-food Management Institute. When asked, several people involved in local food and agriculture couldn’t remember the last time that a workshop like this was hosted here. According to their website, the Agri-food Management Institute (AMI) “promotes […]

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On December 6, the North Grenville Municipal Centre was the site of a special agri-food workshop hosted by the Agri-food Management Institute. When asked, several people involved in local food and agriculture couldn’t remember the last time that a workshop like this was hosted here.

According to their website, the Agri-food Management Institute (AMI) “promotes new ways of thinking about agri-business management and aims to increase awareness, understanding and adoption of beneficial business management practices by Ontario agri-food and agri-based producers and processors”. The organisation is based in Guelph and funded by Growing Forward 2, a federal, provincial, and territorial initiative.

The workshop itself was a full-day event, launched by AMI Executive Director Ashley Honsberger, who was not only the facilitator, but also spoke about exploring the possibility of growing new types of crops, and gave the audience of fifty a number of tips and strategies when contemplating trying something new. Some of the other presenters were: Anna Crolla from OMAFRA, Colleen Acres from Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA), Ruth Vogel from the local chapter of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture (OFA), and Len Davies of Davies Legacy Planning.

Some of the highlights of the day included: Kemptville resident, and OMAFRA specialist, Katie Nolan, speaking about the Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference and the Two Rivers Food Hub. Jessica Kelly, also from OMAFRA, who is a Direct Farm Marketing Specialist, provided some very helpful information about getting started with on-farm sales and value-added products. Bruce Kelly, from Farm & Food Care Ontario, gave an amusing and informative presentation on “Conveying the Story of Agriculture”. He outlined some of the challenges of being a livestock farmer and dealing with animal activists and their activities, both on the farm and at large-scale agricultural events.

It’s unfortunate that the workshop was not better advertised in the area, because some local foodies were disappointed that they hadn’t heard about it. The workshop provided information that would have been useful to both local food producers and agricultural business owners. Jim Beveridge, of B&H Grocery Store, said that he hoped that this workshop was the first of many of these types of educational opportunities to be hosted in North Grenville. Does this mean that the upcoming purchase of the former Kemptville College by the Municipality of North Grenville is making waves in the agri-food community, and alerting people that North Grenville is ready to become a player in agri-food?

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Burritts Rapids Community Association AGM http://www.ngtimes.ca/burritts-rapids-community-association-agm/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/burritts-rapids-community-association-agm/#respond Wed, 06 Dec 2017 19:42:04 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10129 Burritts Rapids is a unique place, both in geography and people. It’s divided into two parts. The part that lies between the two bridges (the island) is within the Municipality of North Grenville. The part that is across the river (Donnelly Drive) lies within the City of Ottawa. Despite the fact that the Burritts Rapids […]

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Burritts Rapids is a unique place, both in geography and people. It’s divided into two parts. The part that lies between the two bridges (the island) is within the Municipality of North Grenville. The part that is across the river (Donnelly Drive) lies within the City of Ottawa.

Despite the fact that the Burritts Rapids Community Hall is in North Grenville, the forty people who attended the Annual General Meeting learned that the City of Ottawa generously contributes money annually to the Burritts Rapids Community Association (BRCA). Ottawa granted $9,610 to the BRCA, while North Grenville granted $881. City of Ottawa Councillor for the Rideau Goulbourn Ward, Scott Moffat, Recreation and Community Development Officer Raynor Boutet, and North Grenville Council members Donovan Arnaud, Frank Onasanya and Barb Tobin attended the meeting.

Chairperson Inge van Gemeren’s annual report highlighted a number of the BRCA’s accomplishments over the past year. These are listed in the article on the Community Hall renovations in this issue. Despite some upcoming challenges, like significant repair work being done on the swing bridge (expected to take 6-8 months) starting in the new year, and the apparent loss of interest on behalf of the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville to initiate traffic calming measures, the BRCA has many things to look forward to in the coming year, according to Inge. More grant funding is expected to be approved in 2018, many upgrades to washroom facilities will be made, and the anticipated growth of the “Friends of the Burritt’s Rapids Community Hall” endowment fund, which very recently reached its critical milestone of $5,000 in funds raised. The continued growth of this fund could potentially mean that the fund could “remove some of the burden of fundraising currently borne by the BRCA”.

After attending the meeting, it’s abundantly clear that this small, but mighty, community is thriving and actively pursuing a bright future for itself. Whether it’s pursuing government funding, or organizing the multitude of events that happen within the hamlet, the BRCA and its volunteers are a model of pride, strength and perseverance. I suspect future residents of Burritts Rapids will be able to enjoy the use of the Hall and community activities for many years to come, thanks to the remarkable people who are building a very strong community foundation today.

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The College – A Done Deal? http://www.ngtimes.ca/college-done-deal/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/college-done-deal/#respond Wed, 22 Nov 2017 19:53:12 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9786 It has come to our attention that the private sector has also expressed interest in the outright acquisition of the Kemptville College. In information exclusive to the North Grenville Times, we have learned that a local firm, representing investors who manage a “humanitarian” fund have made representations to Premier Kathleen Wynne and Minister Jeff Leal […]

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It has come to our attention that the private sector has also expressed interest in the outright acquisition of the Kemptville College. In information exclusive to the North Grenville Times, we have learned that a local firm, representing investors who manage a “humanitarian” fund have made representations to Premier Kathleen Wynne and Minister Jeff Leal to purchase the entire site. They even included lands located in Winchester, even though these are not part of the college purchase.

In their latest letter to Minister Leal, the principals of the firm congratulated him on the negotiation of an agreement in principle with the Municipality of North Grenville on the acquisition of the former College of Agricultural Technology (KCAT). They also let him know that, if the conditions of the agreement were not met, for whatever reason, they would still be interested in moving forward with a purchase of the site.

The letter also states that: “while we remain open to other options that may be available, we believe that an outright purchase of the entire site by the private sector would benefit all parties, i.e. the Province, our consortium of companies and particularly, the Municipality. With the financial capital to develop, maintain, and operate the site, we feel that our prevailing interest in the fusion of agricultural practices with those of environmental humanitarian stewardship would bring new business, employment and credibility to the North Grenville community and to the government of Premier Wynne”. This company has stated its desire to install an agri-environmental research facility on the site of the old college, aimed at testing new technologies in farming with an emphasis on sustainable agricultural practices.

We have learned that the monies available for the purchase of the site come from an international humanitarian fund dedicated to the development of such projects as that of the Kemptville College all over the world. As such, one of the uses of the college proposed for the college would be to provide training and development to foreign students in sustainable agricultural practices.

The firm interested in purchasing the college states that the funds needed are still available. They further state that they would appreciate knowing as soon as possible if they should sustain their current interest or look elsewhere. Their “initial desire” is to assume management of the site by April 1, 2018, in order to get their projects underway.

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Santa defies the elements for the children http://www.ngtimes.ca/santa-defies-elements-children/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/santa-defies-elements-children/#respond Wed, 22 Nov 2017 19:49:37 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9776 This year’s Kemptville Kinsmen Santa Claus Parade appeared to be in jeopardy because of a miserable forecast which called for freezing rain. The decision was made that the show would go on, so everyone involved crossed their fingers that somehow the nasty weather would pass us by. Though it looked bleak right up until the […]

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This year’s Kemptville Kinsmen Santa Claus Parade appeared to be in jeopardy because of a miserable forecast which called for freezing rain. The decision was made that the show would go on, so everyone involved crossed their fingers that somehow the nasty weather would pass us by. Though it looked bleak right up until the final minutes before the parade, the rain stopped and the parade came out to shine. The Town Crier was out early walking the parade route, warding off the rain and passing out chocolates.

This year’s parade theme was inspired by Christmas movies. Onlookers were treated to some very creative floats, including an entry by Juice FM that recreated the movie Christmas Vacation with the Griswald Family, complete with their iconic RV. Some other floats included The Nightmare Before Christmas, A Charlie Brown Christmas, and The Polar Express, which all appeared to have taken a lot of time and effort to construct. Choosing a winner would have been very difficult with so many thoughtful entries.

For the animal lovers in the crowd, there were a number of horses, ponies, and miniature horses, whose presence made some of the young ones squeal with delight. There were also a large number of dogs of all shapes and sizes, from Great Danes down to Chihuhuas, that were riding on the floats and riding in vehicles, but most were walking along beside their humans. There were even some reindeer sightings, but more on that later.

A wide selection of vehicles was on display in the parade as well, with everything from golf carts, bicycles, ATVs and tractor trailers, to mail trucks, vintage fire engines, pickup trucks and kids electric cars. It was interesting to watch several politicians, standing up in the backs of pickup trucks, try to maintain their balance with all of the stopping and starting of the parade.

There was lots of entertainment provided during the parade, as Precision Cheer and Dance performed a number of routines along the parade route. There was even a marching band that played some great Christmas tunes to get people in the mood for the guest of honour.

Speaking of the guest of honour, Santa Claus eventually arrived on the scene once all of the other floats had gone by. Santa’s reindeer accompanied him and appeared poised to take off at any second, but Santa wanted to make sure that he was able to see as many children (of all ages) as possible. He even stopped at the North Grenville Public Library after the parade to see all of the children again, in case he missed any.

Judging by the size of the bags of candy that children were dragging away from the parade area, it looked like they were just finishing up a second Hallowe’en. However, there was no denying that the smiles and laughter of the children weren’t fuelled by a rush of sugar, but by the sweet knowledge that Christmas was coming and that Santa would be returning very soon.

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Deal reached on Kemptville College http://www.ngtimes.ca/deal-reached-kemptville-college/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/deal-reached-kemptville-college/#respond Wed, 15 Nov 2017 20:00:47 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9597 This past Wednesday, November 8, was a landmark day in the history of North Grenville. Though the Municipality is only 9 years old, there was an announcement on Wednesday that may indeed be commemorated for a very long time to come. The Municipality of North Grenville and the Government of Ontario released a joint statement […]

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This past Wednesday, November 8, was a landmark day in the history of North Grenville. Though the Municipality is only 9 years old, there was an announcement on Wednesday that may indeed be commemorated for a very long time to come. The Municipality of North Grenville and the Government of Ontario released a joint statement to announce that the two parties had agreed in principle that the Province will sell a large portion of the main campus and surrounding property of the former Kemptville College Campus to the Municipality.

Although there were no specifics provided on the agreement, such as financial details, breakdown of what exactly the municipality bought, or if other parties were involved in the deal, North Grenville CAO (and North Grenville’s negotiator), Brian Carré, said that the responses to these questions wouldn’t be provided until the formal Agreement of Purchase and Sale (APS) was signed. He could only speculate on when that would be, but he hoped that it would happen by Christmas. The CAO added that the non-disclosure agreement that was in place during negotiations, which kept him from sharing information, is still in place until the APS is signed.

The statement released by the two levels of government failed to disclose many key pieces of information about the purchase. What was the price that North Grenville paid? How will it be paid? Where will the money come from? Will we be taking on debt, or be somehow financing the deal? What’s included in the purchase? Is another organization or private company involved in the purchase? Why does nothing about Kemptville Campus appear in the municipal budget? How will the plan move forward without any money? Who’s responsible for fixing/replacing the underground infrastructure? Do the schools that are there have a financial stake in the deal? Will we finally be able to see all of the feasibility study prepared by BDO?

When asked about what he could disclose, Brian Carré was able to explain that most pieces of the main campus lands and buildings were included in the deal. He also said that areas such as the crop land, forested area, trail system, agroforestry centre, greenhouses, sports facilities, teaching and administration buildings, storage buildings, residences, and the main cafeteria were all included. As far as which pieces of land were included, approximately 633 of the 850 acres will now be owned by North Grenville. During negotiations, the provincial government decided to assign dollar values to particular items and pieces of the former college’s land.

The biggest piece missing from the deal was what is referred to as “the Farm”, which is the piece of land that lies on the east side of County Road 44 and includes the Barr Arena, amongst other buildings. When asked why this piece was excluded, the CAO replied that “bottom line, it was simply too expensive”. The CAO also mused that it didn’t really fit into the future vision for the Kemptville Campus Education and Community Hub. Another piece that was not included was a section of land that is bordered to the south by Concession Road and on one side by the South Branch River. This section was believed to be desired by developers as prime residential development land. Despite the rumours, the message was clear that there was absolutely no intention of selling any part of this new land acquisition for further residential development.

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The Official Plan – A Resident’s Guide http://www.ngtimes.ca/official-plan-residents-guide/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/official-plan-residents-guide/#respond Wed, 08 Nov 2017 19:38:54 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9522 The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing defines an official plan: “An official plan describes your municipal council’s policies on how land in your community should be used. It is prepared with input from you and others in your community and helps to ensure that future planning and development will meet the specific needs of […]

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The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing defines an official plan: “An official plan describes your municipal council’s policies on how land in your community should be used. It is prepared with input from you and others in your community and helps to ensure that future planning and development will meet the specific needs of your community”. Sounds like exciting stuff, right? Well, it may not be exciting, but it sure is important, and you may not realize how important it is until you run into a situation like a local business did recently.

Just some of the reasons why an official plan is needed are: it lets the public know what the municipality’s land use planning policies are; it helps residents of a community understand how their land may be used now and in the future. It helps decide where roads, watermains, sewers, landfills, parks and other services will be built. It provides a framework for establishing municipal zoning bylaws to set local regulations and standards, like the size of lots and the height of buildings. It provides a way to evaluate and settle conflicting land uses while meeting local, regional and provincial interests.

Why is this important to the average resident of North Grenville? Consider these two scenarios. You own a home which is beside a big empty piece of property. You love the peace and quiet of your home. You wake up one morning to a bunch of heavy machinery digging up the property next to you. You remember seeing a letter about something, but you were busy and forgot to go back and read it. You eventually find out that a big new building is being built there, and that the property is about to become a gravel pit, with heavy trucks coming and going all day long. You immediately get upset about this violation of the tranquility and potential loss of value of your property. Then you find out through the municipality that the big piece of property has been approved for these types of uses since the last Official Plan and that there’s little that you can do to stop this construction.

Or, the second scenario: You own a business and the property on which it operates. Your business has become successful, and is growing to the point that you realize that you’re going to have to expand your building to accommodate this new business growth. You go to the municipal offices to get a building permit, and you’re told that you can’t expand your building because the area that your property is in is now zoned as residential, not commercial, due to zoning bylaw changes from the last Official Plan. You also find out that your property is ‘legal non-conforming’. This means that operating your current business on your property is legal, despite the fact that it does not conform to permitted uses in the current zoning bylaw. Nevertheless you’re officially ‘non-conforming’, which means that zoning bylaws can limit your ability to repair or renovate your building, or may even limit how you can use your property.

It’s critical that residents understand how these types of plans can impact their day-to-day lives, their businesses, their future plans, their ability to enjoy or utilize their own property, and their personal finances. Being unaware of the contents of the Official Plan, and its potential impact on you, could possibly cost you tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars. It might also cost you your dream of starting a business, raising chickens on your property, or building that ‘ultimate workshop’ that you’ve always wanted.

Come to the open house and public meeting and get answers to your questions. If you can’t make it to these events, email your questions, concerns, or comments to Planner Phil Mosher at pmosher@northgrenville.on.ca, or call 613-258-9569 ext. 118.

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A Rocking Good Time http://www.ngtimes.ca/rocking-good-time/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/rocking-good-time/#respond Wed, 08 Nov 2017 13:59:05 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9473 Throwing rocks is normally an activity that’s quite frowned upon by adults. Interestingly, this past weekend, every adult in attendance at the North Grenville Curling Club seemed to be more than delighted to watch women from around the world throw them with incredible power and accuracy at their ‘houses’. Though another year of the Royal […]

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Throwing rocks is normally an activity that’s quite frowned upon by adults. Interestingly, this past weekend, every adult in attendance at the North Grenville Curling Club seemed to be more than delighted to watch women from around the world throw them with incredible power and accuracy at their ‘houses’.

Though another year of the Royal Lepage Women’s Fall Classic has come and gone, the fond memories created by one of the premier annual sporting events hosted in the area will linger for participants, volunteers, sponsors and curling fans.

As some of you may already know, the field of twenty-four teams for this event is always a diverse one with teams participating from across the globe. This year’s field was no different as there were two teams from Sweden and one from Russia. Canada is always well represented with teams from Manitoba, Quebec, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and across Ontario in this year’s field. For the first time in the history of the Classic, there was a team participating from west of Manitoba. Delta, British Columbia fielded a team this year making it a true coast-to-coast event.

The Fall Classic itself was a triple knockout format with eight teams advancing to the championship round on Sunday morning. Three teams were able to advance to the final from Friday night with three teams qualifying from Saturday morning and two more qualifying from Saturday night. Team Curtis from Newfoundland had to win three games on Saturday to make it to the final eight on Sunday morning.

Sunday was an intense day of curling for the final eight teams with some remarkable shot-making and teamwork on display for those lucky enough to be watching. One of the early favourites, Team Moiseeva from Russia lost in the quarterfinal to Team MacDiarmid from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia who also beat the impressive junior team Team Daniels from Delta, BC to advance to the final. Team Wrana from Sweden advanced to the final with a morning victory over a weary Team Curtis and then earned a long, closely fought win over (former Classic winners from 2014) Team Auld from Listowel, Ontario.

The final was an international affair as Canada in the form of Team MacDiarmid from Dartmouth, faced off with Sweden whose flag was carried by Team Wrana from Sundbyberg just north of the capital of Stockholm.

Co-chairs for the event Doreen O’Sullivan and Jim Dolan were thrilled with all aspects of this year’s event and wanted to make a point of thanking all volunteers, sponsors, fans and the teams for their part in making the event so successful.

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