News Articles – The North Grenville Times http://www.ngtimes.ca The Voice of North Grenville Sun, 22 Apr 2018 15:09:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 ‘GEMS’ shine their light at HOL’s Dinner on the House http://www.ngtimes.ca/gems-shine-their-light-at-hols-dinner-on-the-house/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/gems-shine-their-light-at-hols-dinner-on-the-house/#respond Sun, 22 Apr 2018 14:57:29 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=12046 Three young ladies, all members of Kemptville’s First Christian Reformed Church GEMS, volunteered their time and energy serving meals at House of Lazarus (HOL)’s April 5 community meal. Gretchen DeVries, Jillian Romard, and Eve Luimes brought new meaning to the phrase “service with a smile” during HOL’s Dinner on the House, last week. Dinner on […]

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Three young ladies, all members of Kemptville’s First Christian Reformed Church GEMS, volunteered their time and energy serving meals at House of Lazarus (HOL)’s April 5 community meal.

Gretchen DeVries, Jillian Romard, and Eve Luimes brought new meaning to the phrase “service with a smile” during HOL’s Dinner on the House, last week. Dinner on the House is a weekly community-building event offering a free meal to everyone.

“The girls were a bit shy at first, but when they got going they were great,” HOL client services manager Kim Merkley said, noting that it’s heart-warming to see young people not only taking an interest in community, but also willing to do what they can to give back.

Most weeks, it is HOL’s chefs who prepare the meals and serve it, alongside a regular set of dedicated and generous volunteers. However, more and more, individuals and groups are stepping up to fund and/or serve a meal. On April 12, the Rotary Club of Kemptville will be supplying and serving the meal for HOL’s Dinner on the House.

For more information and to find out what’s on the menu, visit www.houseoflazarus.com or contact Kim Merkley at kmerkley@houseoflazarus.com or phone 613-989-3830.

House of Lazarus (HOL) is a food bank and outreach mission providing a host of services to those in need. In addition to addressing gaps that impact the vulnerable in our society, HOL is committed to building community by encouraging cooperation, sharing, and partnerships among all levels, from individuals to agencies, businesses, and organizations.

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The Kemptville Hotel http://www.ngtimes.ca/the-kemptville-hotel/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/the-kemptville-hotel/#respond Thu, 19 Apr 2018 13:09:10 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=12141 Although it was generally known as a hotel, this building dates from 1861, and only served as a hotel for a few decades from 1941. It was the site of Lyman Clothier’s first home after he built the mill that gave life to the new village around 1819. In 1861, this brick building replaced the […]

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Although it was generally known as a hotel, this building dates from 1861, and only served as a hotel for a few decades from 1941. It was the site of Lyman Clothier’s first home after he built the mill that gave life to the new village around 1819. In 1861, this brick building replaced the earlier house. It was made from bricks which were made from clay taken from the north bank of the South Branch just below Bridge Street, land owned by the Clothiers. It seems, though, that the expense was too much for the Clothiers, and they had to take out a mortgage on the building in 1868. They defaulted in 1878, and Henry Dell took over possession. He ran a public house and feed store there for many years. Originally, there was a cupola on top of the building that people used to climb to and get a view out over the entire village.

Henry’s son, Edward, took over running the business and the Orange Order had lodge rooms upstairs from about 1880. James Fairbairn took ownership in 1912, but the actual occupant between 1910 and 1940 was Joel Anderson, who used the building as his private residence. Charles Graham bought it and, on January 15, 1941, opened the Graham Hotel.

Charles Graham made many alterations in the structure to make it useable as a hotel. He removed the cupola from the roof, and the hotel contained 17 rooms, according to publicity for the new business, “a number of which will have hot and cold water installed”. The hotel had both heat and electric light, for which the building had been newly wired, and a fire escape ladder was built on to the side. To celebrate the grand opening, Charles and his wife supplied a full turkey dinner to those attending the event.

Charles didn’t enjoy his new venture for long. By 1946 he had died and his wife sold the hotel to Albert and Mary McKeen. The renamed McKeen Hotel continued to do a good business until it was sold in 1967 to a company which operated it as the Kemptville Hotel.

Today, the building has changed little from the days of the Clothiers. The fire escapes in front and at the side are gone, and a large yellow canopy has replaced the older porch over the front door. The days of drinking, appearances by Stompin’ Tom Conners, and a late night sessions have been replaced by, at various times, the Chamber of Commerce, accountants, and other healthier uses.

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National Volunteer Week http://www.ngtimes.ca/national-volunteer-week/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/national-volunteer-week/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 19:00:42 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=12067 Volunteers: the life’s blood of any community. That is so much more than a cliché: try to imagine North Grenville without the Lions Club Christmas Trees and Easter Bunnies. Imagine no Rotary Canada Day Parade, or Christmas in Oxford Mills. The reality in this region is that there are simply not enough weekends in the […]

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Volunteers: the life’s blood of any community. That is so much more than a cliché: try to imagine North Grenville without the Lions Club Christmas Trees and Easter Bunnies. Imagine no Rotary Canada Day Parade, or Christmas in Oxford Mills. The reality in this region is that there are simply not enough weekends in the year to fit everything in that volunteers present for our benefit and support.

Every week, in the North Grenville Times, the pages are filled with concerts, plays, fund raisers of all kinds, OPP BBQ’s and Hey Days in the Summer, and the Sweetheart Brunch in the Winter. What our young people do without the volunteers who coach, train, and transport baseball, softball, hockey, and basketball teams? Everywhere you look, at any time of the year, there are people of all ages giving of their time, energy and money to make good things happen on behalf of their friends and neighbours.

It is been said many times before, but should never be forgotten: it takes a village to raise a child. It also takes a village, a community, to raise children who appreciate getting involved, caring about others, doing what you can to make life better, happier, more fulfilling, for the people around them. The oldest volunteers were raised that way, and they are shining examples of upcoming generations of what a difference volunteering can make, not just to others, but to the volunteers themselves.

It’s a tradition; it’s a joy; and, yes, it’s also a sacrifice. Much nicer, sometimes, to remain safe and warm at home, rather than putting yourself out for others. But it makes a difference, it adds quality to life, it is what adds flavour to your life. So, keep it up, take it up, find your place in this wonderful place we call home.

If you’re new to North Grenville, there’s no shortage of opportunities for you to get involved and become part, a living and active part, of your new neighbourhood. You will never regret it.

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Students hard at work on Loserville the Musical http://www.ngtimes.ca/students-hard-at-work-on-loserville-the-musical/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/students-hard-at-work-on-loserville-the-musical/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 18:57:08 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=12057 Students at North Grenville District High School have been pouring their heart and soul into this year’s production of “Loserville”. The musical, which opens in just under a month, is a rock opera based on the album “Welcome to Loserville” from the band, Son of Dork. It follows high school student, Michael Dork, as he […]

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Students at North Grenville District High School have been pouring their heart and soul into this year’s production of “Loserville”. The musical, which opens in just under a month, is a rock opera based on the album “Welcome to Loserville” from the band, Son of Dork. It follows high school student, Michael Dork, as he tries to invent a way for computers to talk to each other while navigating the complex world of girls and being a teenager. “He is your typical high school nerd,” says Flynn Lystiuk, grade 11, who plays Michael in the musical. “He’s also very endearing, and good looking enough to get the girl.”

“The girl” is Holly, played by grade 12 student, Sam Primeau. Holly is a newcomer at the school who wants people to see her for her brains, rather than her beauty. Her dream is to be the first woman in space. When Michael finds out about this, he wants her help to finish writing his code, as he has been banned from the school’s computer room.

Teacher, Meredith Island, says she stumbled upon the show while looking for a good musical for high school students. “I watched it on YouTube and I fell in love with it,” she says. “I think it was a lot more relatable than the other options.”

Grade 11 student, Emma Thompson, is the stage manager and also plays Yugoslavian exchange student, Ivanka, in the musical. “We wanted something very different from what we’ve done before,” she says.

NGDHS has put on a musical for several years, but this is the first time it hasn’t been a for-credit course. Because of the loss of some key staff members, the school was not able to offer the course this year. When the students found out, they were very disappointed and made it known that they would still like to put on a show. This meant that they had to take over some of the roles that were typically filled by staff members. “It’s nice to see everyone stepping up,” Emma says. “The students that we have are really dedicated, and contribute to the project.”

Although this production is definitely more student-driven than before, Flynn says they couldn’t do any of it without Meredith’s guidance. “It’s a student driven production but, Ms. Island is the leader of leaders,” he says. “The whole reason we are taking initiative as students is because of Ms. Island.”

The 20 cast members meet from 2:30pm to 5:30pm every Wednesday to rehearse, and also get together at lunch and other free time to go over individual scenes. “We’re all working really hard to get it to come together,” Flynn says. They also have some help from NGDHS teacher, Sheryl Hubbard, who is working on choreography with student Kate Breedon, and former student, Morgan Kirkham, is helping Meredith direct.

Meredith says the best part about this year’s production is watching the dedication of the students. “I’m lucky to get to work with these students,” she says. “It’s nice watching everyone’s talents come together to help each other.” The students have their hand in everything, from the costumes and the sets, to the music, which will be played live this year by students on bass guitar, piano, and drums.

NGDHS will welcome the public to two community shows: on Thursday, May 10, at 6:30pm, and Saturday, May 12, at 1:00pm. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children (12 and under).

The students and Meredith will be working hard until then to put together a fun and engaging show for the whole family. “I’m so glad it happened this year,” Emma says, who has been putting every spare minute she has into the musical since November. “I don’t know what I am going to do when it’s over.”

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Reaching The Summit http://www.ngtimes.ca/reaching-the-summit/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/reaching-the-summit/#comments Wed, 18 Apr 2018 18:57:05 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=12071 When people start showing up to register for an event an hour before the registration opens in the morning, usually things go one of two ways from there: sky high, or nuclear meltdown. In this case, the former won the day. Having already exceeded their online registration target, the forty walk-ups who wanted to register […]

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When people start showing up to register for an event an hour before the registration opens in the morning, usually things go one of two ways from there: sky high, or nuclear meltdown. In this case, the former won the day. Having already exceeded their online registration target, the forty walk-ups who wanted to register in person that morning, just further multiplied the positive energy that had been building for the North Grenville Rural Summit.

It was hard to wipe the smiles off the faces of the organizing committee as the people kept filing in, grabbing a coffee and networking over every square inch of the Summit space. Over 160 paid registrants wandered throughout Parish Hall on the campus of the former Kemptville College. Add to that approximately 50 volunteers, partners, sponsors, presenters, media, support staff and invitees, and the space was the perfect size for the event.

The event officially kicked off in the main auditorium with a welcome greeting from MPP Steve Clark, and a heartfelt greeting from Erika Cuccaro who was representing her father, North Grenville Councillor, Jim Bertram. Jim was the Chair of the Summit Organizing Committee until a cancer diagnosis forced him to begin undergoing treatment that wouldn’t allow him to attend the Summit. Next up was North Grenville Councillor, Donovan Arnaud (an organizing committee member), who brought greetings from the Municipality of North Grenville and also spoke of his friend Jim Bertram.

Master of Ceremonies, Deron Johnston (another organizing committee member), kept things humming along, and introduced keynote speaker, Moe Garahan, Executive Director of Just Food in Ottawa. Drawing on a lifetime of personal and professional experience in agriculture, Moe delivered an impassioned and insightful presentation on “the elements needed to build a strong local food system”. The impact of her presentation was immediate, as government employees, politicians, and industry professionals were feverishly writing notes as she spoke. This further resulted in a number of animated conversations out in the hallways afterwards. It was also a very timely discussion, as it touched on several points that appeared to align with the Municipality of North Grenville’s future plans for the former Kemptville College campus, which they officially acquired a mere ten days ago from the provincial government.

Two full rounds of smaller workshops followed the keynote, allowing attendees to wander in and out of smaller lecture hall-type rooms. Some of the more well-attended topics of the morning were: “How Agri-tourism can add revenue to an agricultural business”, “Raising local food awareness through farmers’ markets”, “The new drone economy” (a discussion on drone technology) and “The importance of online connectivity on the farm”.

After an unforgettable roast beef/chicken buffet meal (with all ingredients sourced within 100km of Kemptville) in the campus cafeteria, and prepared by Catered Affairs, everyone headed back to Parish Hall for another two rounds of learning. There were some very tough choices for people to make throughout the day, as they often wanted to see multiple workshops that were going on at the same time. “Bee-keeping for small batch honey”, “B&H 55 years in grocery retail”, “Growing indoors” and “Changes in municipal land use planning” appeared to draw the attention of the majority of people in the afternoon sessions.

To close out the day, Kemptville resident, Katie Nolan, from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) led a panel discussion on “Creating opportunities in agriculture as a community”. Panelists were Pat Remillard (new project manager for the Kemptville Campus project) and Jim Beveridge (owner of B&H and organizing committee member). After the discussion, there were a number of questions asked, and it was obvious that people wanted to know more about the future plans for the Kemptville Campus.

As Deron said in his closing remarks, the committee wanted to thank everyone for making the summit such a success, including the partners, sponsors, presenters, volunteers, trade show participants, guests, media contributors, and support staff. He also personally thanked Julia, Angie and Isabelle of “In The Moment Events” who were able to take the vision of the organizing committee, come up with a plan for the event, and make it happen. As Deron noted, had Jim Bertram been there, he knew that Jim would have been very proud to see his vision fully realized.

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Kemptville Lions celebrate 60 years http://www.ngtimes.ca/kemptville-lions-celebrate-60-years/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/kemptville-lions-celebrate-60-years/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 18:55:14 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=12090 The Kemptville Lions Club are marking sixty years of service to the people of their community on April 28. A very special Charter Meeting will be held at the North Grenville Municipal Centre that evening, and there will be three very special guests among the many coming from all over the region to be part […]

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The Kemptville Lions Club are marking sixty years of service to the people of their community on April 28. A very special Charter Meeting will be held at the North Grenville Municipal Centre that evening, and there will be three very special guests among the many coming from all over the region to be part of the event. Three men who were there on March 24, 1958 will be on hand to witness the Diamond Jubilee of the Club: Ralph Raina, Sam Gaw and Jack Higgins were among the 38 men who elected Don Armstrong as the first President, with Ted Root as Secretary and Ralph himself as the first Treasurer.

The Club had its origins in a meeting held the previous January 22, when representatives of the Lions International. The Merrickville Lions Club acted as sponsor for the new Kemptville grup, which has proved itself a vital and valued part of our area ever since. For many years, meetings were held in the old Kemptville Hotel and St. John’s United Church, before settling into a regular venue at the old Bright Spot Restaurant. And from those meetings have come a host of projects to benefit the community, the province and even other countries.

Over the coming year, we hope to feature some of those projects in the Times, to acknowledge the role the Kemptville Lions Club has played over the past sixty years. Everyone living in North Grenville today has been touched by the Kemptville Lions, whether they know it or not. It was the Lions who supplied house numbers for very home in Kemptville when the Town Council first assigned street addresses to the homes in the town. The Lions provided $2,000 a year to pay for the community’s swimming pool in Riverside Park, beginning in 1966 and continuing until the pool was fully paid for.

Over the years, the Lions have supplied baseball diamonds in Riverside Park, as well as installing a lighting system to allow for evening and night-time games there. They have sponsored a community room at the North Grenville Municipal Centre, provided BBQ’s for Canada Day, and an annual BBQ in aid of Kemptville & District Home Support’s seniors, as well as numerous other charitable events.

Their support of North Grenville Accessible Transportation, the Kemptville District Hospital, the Community Service Council and so many other great causes cannot be overestimated: they have simply been indispensable in the life of North Grenville over sixty years. Volunteers are vital: the Kemptville Lions Club have taken volunteerism to new heights on our behalf.

But it is on an international stage that the Kemptville Lions played an almost unique role. Back in 1961, Lion Ralph Raina proposed that the Club “undertake sight conservation and work for the blind as our major project”. That resolution was carried and it began a project that continues to this day. Used eye glasses are collected and cleaned, and recycled through the Lions Recycle for Sight program. Every two weeks, Lions meet at the Christian Reformed Church in Kemptville, which supplies them with a room for storage and cleaning of donated glasses. The details of this project deserve an article of its own, and you can read all about it in an upcoming issue of the Times.

In the meantime, the Kemptville Lions Club will celebrate 60 years of uninterrupted service to the people of North Grenville, the Province and the world on April 28. It should be and deserves to be, quite a celebration. Congratulations to each and every Lion.

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Changing of the guard http://www.ngtimes.ca/changing-of-the-guard/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/changing-of-the-guard/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 18:54:17 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=12061 The impact of the recent North Grenville Rural Summit continues to be felt, and not only in the municipality. Elsewhere in this issue you can read the statement made to the Ontario Legislature by MPP Steve Clark, one of the many political and agri-business people who attended the event on April 7. In addition to […]

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The impact of the recent North Grenville Rural Summit continues to be felt, and not only in the municipality. Elsewhere in this issue you can read the statement made to the Ontario Legislature by MPP Steve Clark, one of the many political and agri-business people who attended the event on April 7. In addition to the organising committee, Steve paid special tribute to Councillor Jim Bertram, the man whose drive and vision made the Summit possible. Jim has been working, ever since he was elected, to bring about a greater awareness of the needs, issues and concerns of the rural community, as well as the potential economic and social benefits that attach to agri-business generally. Steve Clark referred to him as “a true champion of rural Ontario”, and it was a shame Jim had to miss the event. But fighting for your life against aggressive cancer is a far higher priority for anyone.

But, thanks to the work Jim and the others on the organising committee put in over the past months, the overall response to the Summit has been universally positive, and there is now a hope that we will see a permanent committee, or some other form of rural affairs oversight, at the municipal level. Jim Bertram was part of a team that included Deron Johnston, Jim Beveridge and Donovan Arnaud, and even a cursory glance at the list of sponsors, business supporters and the suppliers of food and beverages, shows just how much of a community event it was.

This is National Volunteer Week, and the Summit was another in a very, very long list of activities taking place in our community that depend on volunteers for their success. Without volunteers, and the support they receive from local business, this would be a much poorer place in terms of quality of life and care of our neighbours. The attendance and public participation in the Summit shows how much residents and business care about rural issues, and how great is the potential for further growth in that field (not a pun!).

However, we can’t be sure that the all of the current council will take advantage of the positive energy left behind by the event. There was clear resistance to the very idea of the Rural Summit at the municipal level. Jim Bertram was on the point of investing his own money just to make it happen, and, although the municipality provided a $5000.00 grant for the budget, which amounted to about 33% of the total, it was reluctantly given. This should not have been the case, as such an event is clearly laid down in the Municipality’s Strategic Plan.

At the Council meeting following the Summit, positive remarks were made by the Mayor, the CAO and Councillor Tobin: yet not one of them mentioned their colleague, Jim Bertram’s name. Councillor Arnaud at least indicated that the success of the Summit would lead to future events, and declared that “this is the beginning of something much greater”. Donovan Arnaud had stepped in to fill in for Jim Bertram after Jim’s health required him to take a leave of absence from his municipal duties. His remarks were positive and welcome.

The remarks of CAO Brian Carré were concerned entirely with the takeover of the campus by the municipality, his favourite subject these days. Apparently, the Rural Summit somehow proved how correct the municipality was to take over the property. It was, he said, “a testament” to the decision of the municipality. Without mentioning Jim Bertram’s role in the Summit, Mr. Carré said that “it was an afternoon that certainly made us feel good about the fact that we have acquired the campus”. It’s a pity there was not more support for Councillor Bertram before the event, and some recognition of his role afterwards.

Councillor Onansanya was not present at that meeting. Mayor Gordon then launched into a most surprising and rambling speech about what he termed the “disease” of human trafficking in Ontario. He blamed it all on the “politically correct atmosphere in Ontario”. Given the other serious issues facing North Grenville, I doubt that human trafficking is one of priorities our municipal council need to be dealing with these days. The mayor did then move on to mention the Rural Summit in one sentence, again with no mention of Jim Bertram.

I don’t know, but to fail to mention a colleague then in hospital fighting for his life, while at the same time taking pride in the event that he had promoted and they had resisted, seems just a little lacking in class. Perhaps they need to admit, if only to themselves, that they have been negligent of the needs of this community, while one of their members, in spite of health problems, put together a team of residents and provided North Grenville with an event worthy to be brought to the attention of the provincial legislature. Small-minded and petty. Time for a changing of the guard.

Best wishes to Jim, and congratulations to Deron Johnston, Jim Beveridge and Donovan Arnaud, as well as the many individuals and businesses in the region who made this event such a success.

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Growing farmers http://www.ngtimes.ca/growing-farmers/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/growing-farmers/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 18:50:12 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=12055 When thinking about agriculture, it’s logical to think about “growing” in terms of crops and livestock. There’s another “growing” concern, and that is the need to grow the number of farmers. According to the Census of Agriculture 2016, there are now 193,492 farmers in Canada, which is down 5.9% from the Census of 2011. By […]

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When thinking about agriculture, it’s logical to think about “growing” in terms of crops and livestock. There’s another “growing” concern, and that is the need to grow the number of farmers. According to the Census of Agriculture 2016, there are now 193,492 farmers in Canada, which is down 5.9% from the Census of 2011. By comparison, in 1961, there were almost 481,000 farmers. The (sort of) good news is that this is the lowest rate of decline in the past twenty years.

According to Stats Can, 92% of farmers have no written succession plan for the future of their farm. In the past, it was just assumed that the next generation would step in and take over the farm, but this is no longer a safe assumption. Instead, farmers have been forced to begin selling off their land, in whole or in parts, to developers or other farms, in order to recover the equity they’ve built up. For anyone looking to get into farming (and even for those who are part of an existing farming family), the cost to buy an existing farm, or even a piece of productive agricultural land, is often well beyond their reach, especially for young people.

On a positive note, there was a slight increase in the number of farmers under age 35, between 2011 and 2016, for the first time since 1991 (up to almost 25,000). This appears to be mostly driven by an increase in the number of young women now operating farms, and millennials who are motivated about small scale organic farming and local food. Though this is a positive development, the average age of a Canadian farmer is 55, and this has risen steadily for decades, with the number of farmers over 70 far exceeding those under 35.

The message appears to be clear: we need more farmers and, further, we need to support and encourage young people to enter farming. Instead of focusing on the general financial viability of farming, it might be time to shift gears and start providing direct support for young farmers. Agriculture and Agri-food Canada states that the federal government does supply some funding and loan support to young farmers for farm transitions in the form of deferred payments and interest-only payments, but it is limited.

One important aspect of providing effective support for young farmers would be the need for education and relevant hands-on training. Even with the financial resources needed to begin farming, not having an appropriate level of knowledge and training is like starting any other business without knowing anything about how to run a business and/or having limited knowledge about your chosen field. In this case, the long-term result will probably not be a positive one.

Maybe it’s time to consider offering an open, free, post-secondary education program in Ontario to potential farmers, one that requires a long-term commitment from participants (for example – participants must agree to operate a full-time agriculture-based business for a specified period). A comprehensive two-year limited entry program that incorporates hands-on training in essential topics like agricultural business finance, marketing for agricultural business, livestock basics, soil science basics, crop planning, agricultural innovations, etc., could prepare graduates for the day-to-day operations involved in farming. There are a number of organizations that offer workshop style programming for farmers throughout Ontario, but an all-in-one program would probably be a more efficient way to deliver the necessary training.

There are some limited programs available in Ontario, like the Collaborative Regional Alliance for Farmer Training in Southwestern Ontario, which is helping young people to prepare for farming by offering them internships at a network of small-scale organic farms. Unfortunately, some other similar programs that have been offered in the past have disappeared because of the lack of long-term sustainable funding.

By combining these elements: education, hands-on training, and post-program funding support for graduates, this would appear to be the best-case scenario to ensure a steady influx of new farmers that can “hit the ground running” and reduce the rate at which we’re losing farmers. Some would argue that a program like this would be too costly.

Respectfully, from a food security perspective, the more food that we produce locally, the less vulnerable our food supply becomes to negative forces beyond our control and influence. Add to that the sizable local economic benefit generated by buying locally produced food and agri-products, and one could argue that it’s an essential investment in our collective future.

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Discovery Days for youth ages 6-12 http://www.ngtimes.ca/discovery-days-for-youth-ages-6-12/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/discovery-days-for-youth-ages-6-12/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 18:48:53 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=12076 Discovery Days are a fantastic one-day 4-H experience for youth curious about joining and for 4-H members. Youth are able to learn about all that 4-H has to offer as we “Walk on the 4-H Side”. The day will include making a craft, learning about the site line of cattle, exploring 4-H through our famous […]

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Discovery Days are a fantastic one-day 4-H experience for youth curious about joining and for 4-H members. Youth are able to learn about all that 4-H has to offer as we “Walk on the 4-H Side”. The day will include making a craft, learning about the site line of cattle, exploring 4-H through our famous Go For The Gold trivia, working in a team for a round of Human Tic Tac Toe and so much more—all in one day! Along with all of this, participants get a pizza lunch, a t-shirt to decorate and take home and the chance to meet new friends. Each year is a new experience.

For just $20, Discovery Days provide a full day of fun from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., including lunch and a Discovery Days t-shirt for each participant. These camps are open to both 4-H members and non-members alike, but have a maximum registration of 60 participants.

Looking to get your friends involved in 4-H? Bring a friend to Discovery Days and be entered to win a great 4-H prize pack!

4-H Region 2: Registration Deadline: May 28, 2018
Location: North Grenville Municipal Centre,  Kemptville
Event Date: June 9, 2018

Additional information for Discovery Days for other regions, as well as the registration form, can be found by visiting the 4-H Ontario website at www.4-hontario.ca/discoverydays.

We appreciate Beef Farmers of Ontario for being the Title Sponsor of Discovery Days.
4-H Ontario is a non-profit positive youth development organization that builds youth as leaders within their communities and assets to the world. With roots in rural Ontario, today it is open to youth of all backgrounds across the province. 4-H youth ages 6–21 and screened, engaged volunteer leaders come together to learn about selected topics through fun hands-on activities and mentorship. There are also provincial camps, conferences, competitions and national and international travel opportunities available to further develop skills in leadership, business, self-confidence and more. 4-H provides youth with a place they can be involved, accepted, valued and heard while developing valuable skills for leadership and life.

For more information please contact: Lindsay Bebbington, Coordinator, Programming, 519.856.0992 x468, opportunities@4-hontario.ca.

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Steve Clark reports to the Legislature on the Rural Summit http://www.ngtimes.ca/steve-clark-reports-to-the-legislature-on-the-rural-summit/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/steve-clark-reports-to-the-legislature-on-the-rural-summit/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 18:44:43 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=12074 Last Wednesday, MPP Steve Clark reported to the Ontario Legislature on the success of the North Grenville Rural Summit. His remarks were as follows: “On Saturday, I attended the North Grenville Rural Summit, which put the spotlight on eastern Ontario entrepreneurs and innovators. It was great to spend time with people creating jobs and bringing […]

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Last Wednesday, MPP Steve Clark reported to the Ontario Legislature on the success of the North Grenville Rural Summit. His remarks were as follows:

“On Saturday, I attended the North Grenville Rural Summit, which put the spotlight on eastern Ontario entrepreneurs and innovators. It was great to spend time with people creating jobs and bringing investment to our rural communities.

I wish every Ontarian living in an urban centre could have been in Kemptville with me on Saturday. What an incredible opportunity for them to understand that rural Ontario is more than just the blur they see from the car window as they travel from one city to the next.

They could see how agribusinesses are succeeding, despite challenges, like increasing red tape, local infrastructure needs, high energy prices and access to skilled workers. Their perseverance and determination are incredible, and I’m thankful they had the opportunity to share their stories so we could learn more on how we can better support them.

The summit was the dream of North Grenville councillor Jim Bertram, a true champion of rural Ontario. Jim recognized that our rural communities and the businesses sustaining them are too often taken for granted, and he wanted to do something positive to change that. Unfortunately, Jim is battling an illness and couldn’t be there on Saturday. Our thoughts and prayers are with him and his family, and we wish him a speedy recovery.

We all know farmers feed cities. But with the right support from a government that appreciates them, our farmers and rural entrepreneurs can help make Ontario grow.
I want to thank Jim for his vision. I hope that the summit becomes an annual event in North Grenville.”

On his Facebook page, Steve repeated his appreciation of the organising committee that had put on the event: “I commend everyone who worked so hard to organize the event, but in particular I want to say thanks to Municipality of North Grenville Councillor Jim Bertram. As I said in my Member’s Statement, Jim is a tremendous champion for rural Ontario and the summit was part of his vision to showcase how critical the agri-business sector is to our economy, both here in Leeds-Grenville and across the province.”

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