History – The North Grenville Times http://www.ngtimes.ca The Voice of North Grenville Thu, 12 Jul 2018 22:33:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.7 Merrickville 225:Those were the days http://www.ngtimes.ca/merrickville-225those-were-the-days/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/merrickville-225those-were-the-days/#respond Wed, 11 Jul 2018 18:05:44 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=13567 With talk of municipal amalgamations being heard in various quarters today, it is always interesting to look back to a time when the Township of Wolford was at the centre of a large amalgamated area. The Minutes of Council from 1802 until 1846 were set down in a “Town Book…for the Use of the Township […]

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With talk of municipal amalgamations being heard in various quarters today, it is always interesting to look back to a time when the Township of Wolford was at the centre of a large amalgamated area. The Minutes of Council from 1802 until 1846 were set down in a “Town Book…for the Use of the Township of Woolford [as the Clerk spelt it constantly] and the Townships Incorporated therewith, Viz., Montague, Marlborough & Oxford”. It seems the Minutes were kept on separate sheets of paper, until the book itself was “Purchased by Mr. Joseph Haskins” in 1809 for the princely sum of 20 shillings, or £1; quite a lot of money in those days.

The very first Town Meeting was held on March 1, 1802 at the home of James Lakes, and Henry Arnold was elected Clerk for that year. Names that are still familiar today appear in the minutes of that first meeting, as what now sound like very exotic positions were filled. Daniel Burritt was appointed as one of the pound keepers that year. He was also appointed to a few other positions, such as Assessor and Overseer of Highways. Joseph Easton was named as Town Warden, along with William Brown.

They may not have had sign bylaws, and no-one was told what colour they could paint their front door, but some of the laws passed in 1802 were equally specific. For example, all fences had to be four feet, six inches high, and there had to be a space of five inches between the four bottom rails. This had to do with keeping animals from wandering, but an exception was made for hogs. “That all Hogs are to run at large in free but that those which do the people of the Neighbourhood damage, Shall be yoked with a sufficient yoke, or shut up, provided that the fences are Lawful.”

Some of the entries in the early years are a little obscure. In 1803, for example, it states that: “Ordered That Horses, Horned Cattle, Sheep and Swine Stand voted according to the Acts of the Province”.

One of the more interesting aspects of Council Minutes is the recording of births in the Townships. The population was small enough to make each birth a matter of interest, and it was clear that some couples were doing their part in adding to the community. William and Chloe Brown, of Wolford, had a son, Erastus, born in 1791, one of the earliest births in the region. Then, in 1792, they had another son; and yet more sons in 1794, 1796 and 1799. Daniel Burritt and his wife Electa, had a son in 1798, a daughter, Urania, in 1802, and Daniel jnr was born in 1804.

Finding unusual names for your children was something parents liked to do back then, just as they do today. But some of those names… We’ve come across Urania and Electa Burritt, but there was also Shankful Olmstead, Arethusa Powers, Orra Pamele, and Axy Waller. Jabez was a popular name, along with the more usual Hiram, Ira, Truman, Caleb and Erastus. It was a close knit community, where neighbours depended on each other for so many things. Wolford’s population in 1802 was 165, and Oxford’s was just 14, the Harris family who lived just outside what would become Burritt’s Rapids.

By 1815, just before significant immigration arrived after the War of 1812, Wolford’s population had grown to 322, but Oxford’s had only reached 25. That wave of immigration was soon to radically alter the character and make-up of the Townships. Two years later, in 1817, Oxford had 71 residents, while Wolford’s population remained almost unchanged. But the laws remained consistent. “Ordered that Sheep shall be free Commoners Except Rams for which the Law has made Provision”. It’s a brief insight into life in our locality a century ago, at a time when roads were primitive, at best; when a rural lifestyle of subsistence and labour was about to be transformed by the building of the Rideau Canal, and a whole new era would dawn.

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The Salvation Army Hall, Water Street, Kemptville http://www.ngtimes.ca/the-salvation-army-hall-water-street-kemptville/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/the-salvation-army-hall-water-street-kemptville/#respond Thu, 05 Jul 2018 14:43:05 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=13529 Many people in North Grenville will remember this building as the Sears Store; but long before the catalogues brought stoves and clothes to the people of the area, this was the headquarters of the Salvation Army Corps. In January, 1888, just over 130 years ago, a parade of men and women in uniform were seen […]

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Many people in North Grenville will remember this building as the Sears Store; but long before the catalogues brought stoves and clothes to the people of the area, this was the headquarters of the Salvation Army Corps. In January, 1888, just over 130 years ago, a parade of men and women in uniform were seen marching down Asa Street towards Prescott Street, accompanied by loud music and singing. The Salvation Army had arrived for the first time, and as they turned up Prescott Street and crossed the bridge, many curious onlookers followed along to see what was happening. The first meetings were held either outdoors, or in a disused billiard room on Asa Street, across the road from where the Salvation Army Thrift Store now operates.

But a more permanent home was built on Water Street, with timber provided by Charlie Hagan. The Clothier Saw Mill cut the logs into lumber. The Army operated from this Hall until 1959, when a new Hall was opened on Oxford Street, where the Army still operates.

But it was in the Water Street Hall that the Army first began to preach the Gospel and reach out to surrounding communities, including Oxford Mills, where they established an “ outpost” for many decades. Among those who attended the meetings in the Water Street Hall was a young G. Howard Ferguson, who would go on to become Premier of Ontario. It is a building, now lying unused, which has seen many glorious meetings, much music and song, and had a major impact on the lives of many local residents over many years.

The second photograph shows Ellen Burley and the Army Band in the old Hall soon after it was built.

Ellen Burley and the Army Band

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10 Water Street, Oxford Mills, Ontario http://www.ngtimes.ca/10-water-street-oxford-mills-ontario/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/10-water-street-oxford-mills-ontario/#respond Thu, 28 Jun 2018 17:59:02 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=13273 Every house has story: a tale of families who built it, lived in it, raised families and filled it with life. The house in the picture was built in 1910 and has been a feature of Oxford Mills since then, seeing many changes in the village, and even on the street on which it stands. […]

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Every house has story: a tale of families who built it, lived in it, raised families and filled it with life. The house in the picture was built in 1910 and has been a feature of Oxford Mills since then, seeing many changes in the village, and even on the street on which it stands. Across the road was the Orange Hall and the McGee hotel. General stores rose up and burned down beside it. The property consists of lots 10 and 12, Water Street, as well as part of lot 15 on Main Street. Lot 12 was the first lot sold in the newly-surveyed village in 1849. It was bought by Moses Lefaver, a blacksmith, who bought the lot across the road where he built his smithy. This is the building with the chalk drawing of a horse’s head, now covered with vinyl siding

Lots 10 and 12 remained under separate ownership until 1910. The houses on the two lots were owned by widows and both burned down in 1909. James W. Fretwell, who owned the cheese factory by the bridge, bought the two lots. The local newspaper reported on August 25, 1910:

“Report says that Mr. W. Fretwell has bought the two lots on Water Street owned by Mrs. J. Edwards and Mrs. E. Gilmour, and intends buildings.”

He began to build this house in September, 1910. The newspaper was keeping everyone up to date on developments. On September 15, it noted that “Mr. W. Fretwell has started to dig the cellar for his new house”.

On December 1, 1910, the paper reported that: “Mr. W. Fretwell is erecting a beautiful residence of concrete with iron roof on the lots formerly owned by Mrs. Edwards and Mrs. Gilmour. He expects to have it ready for living in by Christmas”.

Fretwell had bought the one of the two vacant lots for $75 but there seems to be record of what he paid for the other.

Fretwell sold the property to Frederick Murray in 1919, for $6,000, but bought it back in 1923 for $5,400. In 1925 he sold the property and his cheese factory to Walter Hargrave. The Hargraves owned the house from 1925 until 1954. The cheese factory’s roof collapsed in the winter of 1947 because of the weight of snow and never reopened.

When Walter died in 1954, his widow, Jessie, sold the house. There is a wonderful collection of photographs taken by the Hargraves over the decades they lived here.

Now almost 108 years old, this home and the land it’s built on, has seen a lot of history and has many stories to tell.

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Canada Day History http://www.ngtimes.ca/canada-day-history/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/canada-day-history/#respond Wed, 27 Jun 2018 18:57:43 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=13328 Canada Day has become such a central part of the Canadian year that it is easy to forget that it is a very recent arrival on the scene. On October 27, 1982, the Parliament of Canada initiated Canada Day following the repatriation of the Canadian Constitution that year. Before 1982, July 1 was known as […]

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Canada Day has become such a central part of the Canadian year that it is easy to forget that it is a very recent arrival on the scene. On October 27, 1982, the Parliament of Canada initiated Canada Day following the repatriation of the Canadian Constitution that year. Before 1982, July 1 was known as Dominion Day, and had been acknowledged as Canada’s birthday from the date when the British North America Act came into force in 1867. The following year, 1868, the Governor General at the time suggested that Canadians celebrate Dominion Day as their National Holiday.

Surprisingly, Dominion Day was not itself a major event for decades after 1867. It took another ten years before there was any legislation passed for the recognition of the holiday. In fact, the first official government celebration of Dominion Day only happened in 1917, on the 50th anniversary of Confederation. The Canadian Government started organising official celebrations in 1958, and it was after that that the name “Canada Day” started to be used. There was, however, great argument among Canadians about using that term, as it seemed a break with tradition. However, the plain truth is that there was very little tradition of Dominion Day celebrations before the 1950’s.

In North Grenville one hundred years ago, Dominion Day was a hit and miss affair. Some years there were celebrations in Kemptville, other years the day passed without comment or activities of any kind. It seems that the day’s events depended on various groups and organisations within the community, just as is true today. In 1911, the events were sponsored by the local Catholic Church congregation. A large dinner was held in the Agricultural Hall, put on by the ladies of the congregation, and was attended by the Secretary of State, Charles Murphy, as well as the local M.P.P., G. Howard Ferguson. Murphy pointed out that the occasion was “not racial, not sectarian; but national”, and praised the rise of Imperial sentiment in Canada in the years since Confederation. Ferguson, who would one day be Premier of Ontario, stated that the province was the best place in the country, and would “remain the Banner Province of the Dominion”.

After the speeches came the athletics. Races were held over various distances, from the hundred yards dash, to the two mile marathon. Needless to say, only males were allowed to race. No-one from Kemptville won a race, though in the Boys’ Race, W. McGovern of Oxford came first, and Harold McGahey came second. The big event of the afternoon was the baseball match between Kemptville and Merrickville, which the home team won 3 -2. Music throughout was supplied by the Harmony Band of Smith’s Falls, this being one of those periods when Kemptville was without a band of its own. The people then adjourned back to the Hall for a supper, also served by the ladies of the Catholic Church. By the time a big storm blew in that evening, the crowds had already wound their way home.

In 1912, it was the Baseball Club that ran the day’s events. The day started with a parade, or a “Trade Procession” as it was called then. It began at Riverside Park, wound around the streets, and ended up back at the Park again. The parade was led by the Texan Ranger Band from Ottawa. Who they were is unclear, but the Texan theme ran through the day’s festivities. The Band, accompanied by two pipers, played for an hour outside the Advance building on Prescott Street, filling in the time before the main event of the day: the sports activities in Riverside Park, where there were races, both human and horse, and a wonderful event called “Catch the Greasy Pig”. The big baseball game was between Kemptville and Spencerville, and all went well aside from some Spencerville teenagers who took to insulting anyone not from their town.

In the evening, there was a special concert at the Oddfellows Hall, which included an escape artist, whose ability to free himself from handcuffs and the “torture cabinet” amazed the audience. There were also “Scotch” dancers, and comedy from Sam and Guss, “the colored comedians”. And, to round off the day, the Texan Concert Orchestra provided the music for a dance at the Hall.

The following year, 1913, it seems there were no celebrations, possibly owing to the lack of an organising group. But, looking at the reports of Dominion Day one hundred years ago, what is surprising is how little it has changed. They had Dominion Day, and we have Canada Day. We still have our activities through the afternoon in both Kemptville and Oxford Mills, and an evening of music to end the day at Riverside Park. They had concerts and we have fireworks. But the event is still focussed on the celebration of Canada and its people. For years before the Government saw fit to celebrate the day officially, the people of North Grenville were marking the occasion with music, fun and sports. Long may that continue.

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Newspapers and Confederation http://www.ngtimes.ca/newspapers-and-confederation/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/newspapers-and-confederation/#respond Wed, 27 Jun 2018 18:25:54 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=13322 In the 1860’s, there was no consistent reporting of the debates in the Legislatures of British North America, so, when Confederation was being debated and argued over, it was only by reading newspapers that the people of the colonies could find out what was happening. Many of the politicians involved in those debates were themselves […]

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In the 1860’s, there was no consistent reporting of the debates in the Legislatures of British North America, so, when Confederation was being debated and argued over, it was only by reading newspapers that the people of the colonies could find out what was happening. Many of the politicians involved in those debates were themselves either journalists or newspaper owners at various times. Today, historians rely on those newspaper reports in order to know what was said, what ideas were put forward, and which pressures were brought to bear against the men who were building a new country.

In fact, one Canadian historian, P. B. Waite, wrote an account of the entire Confederation story based entirely on newspaper records. The Fourth Estate, as the media are called, remain a vital part of the democratic system in Canada.

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Kingdom of Canada http://www.ngtimes.ca/kingdom-of-canada/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/kingdom-of-canada/#respond Wed, 27 Jun 2018 18:17:23 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=13319 Right up until the very last days before Confederation was enshrined in legislation in the British Parliament, there was still disagreement about what the new country would be called. The most popular title among all the representatives of the Colonies, as well as the Imperial Government, was The Kingdom of Canada. Everyone believed that it […]

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Right up until the very last days before Confederation was enshrined in legislation in the British Parliament, there was still disagreement about what the new country would be called. The most popular title among all the representatives of the Colonies, as well as the Imperial Government, was The Kingdom of Canada. Everyone believed that it was important to emphasise the continuing links with the British Empire, and the new country’s identity as a part of that loyalist tradition.

However, it was finally decided that such a name would be objectionable to the Americans. The strains of the Civil War remained a major element in the relations between the United States and the new Canada. There had been threats of invasion made by the victorious Northern Forces in retaliation for the Canadians’ support of the Confederate States.

Therefore, the name of the new nation would not be The Kingdom, but the Dominion of Canada.

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Leahurst House, Kemptville Campus http://www.ngtimes.ca/leahurst-house-kemptville-campus/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/leahurst-house-kemptville-campus/#respond Thu, 21 Jun 2018 13:26:17 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=13267 Here is a building that predates most buildings in North Grenville, but is almost unknown, except to children! Today, it is the home of the North Grenville Co-operative Pre-School and Learning Centre,  a non-profit, fully co-operative organization run by parents and community members which has owned the building since 2004. However, it began life as […]

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Here is a building that predates most buildings in North Grenville, but is almost unknown, except to children! Today, it is the home of the North Grenville Co-operative Pre-School and Learning Centre,  a non-profit, fully co-operative organization run by parents and community members which has owned the building since 2004. However, it began life as the farm homestead of Thomas McCargar and his family, who bought the west half of lot 27 in the fourth concession of Oxford in 1830. When Thomas sold the property to Benjamin McCargar in 1845, it had doubled in value, and the house must have been built some time in those fifteen years. The McCargars were one of the earliest settlers in South Gower Township, and when Thomas moved his family to this lot in Oxford in 1830, he was one of the first four settlers in the Kemptville area. In 1836, Thomas had been appointed a Captain in the Grenville Militia, and he saw action at the Battle of the Windmill in November, 1838.

In the 1840’s, the house was described as a stone house with three fireplaces, and valued at £155, quite a valuable property in the day. The house continued to serve as a centre for the farm for the next sixty years, until the 112 acres were bought by the Ontario Government on October 12, 1916 to be incorporated into the planned Kemptville Agricultural School. The photograph shows the farmhouse before remodelling took place in 1918, when it became the home for the College Principal. Work crews constructed a cellar under the entire house and added a second story. The following year, a veranda was added to the front of the house and a bedroom and balcony to the back. In 1949, the back veranda was replaced by a smaller stone veranda. Architecturally, Leahurst is distinguished by three half round dormers and a two tier tin roof.

The farm buildings were demolished to make way for the Judging Pavilion, known today as Purvis Hall, named after Jim Purvis, who was in charge of the English Department at KAS. It was he who named the building “Leahurst”, which combines two Old English words and means “house on a grassy hill”. Over the years, it has been used as a women’s residence for the College, and the centre for the Home Management and Food Management courses. It was renovated in the mid1980’s, when stones from the original farm walls were used to make the current fireplace.

Thomas McCargar would be, I think, very surprised to know that his farmhouse was still in use, and, perhaps, even more surprised at its current users. This Heritage building, situated in the scenic grounds of the Kemptville Campus, remains as one of North Grenville’s hidden gems.

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Orlando Bush: Genesis and Exodus http://www.ngtimes.ca/orlando-bush-genesis-and-exodus/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/orlando-bush-genesis-and-exodus/#respond Wed, 20 Jun 2018 18:04:39 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=13250 In the last years of the Nineteenth Century, a strange exodus took place, residents of Kemptville and surrounding area moved in large numbers to Alberta. Most of these migrants were members of the Baptist Church on Clothier Street West in the Village of Kemptville, and so many of them moved away to Alberta that the […]

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In the last years of the Nineteenth Century, a strange exodus took place, residents of Kemptville and surrounding area moved in large numbers to Alberta. Most of these migrants were members of the Baptist Church on Clothier Street West in the Village of Kemptville, and so many of them moved away to Alberta that the church had to close due to lack of numbers. The exodus included the founder and owner of the local newspaper, S. E. Walt, a local lawyer, Alexander Rutherford, who would go on to become the first Premier of Alberta, and a leading businessman and politician, Orlando Bush.

Orlando was born on Christmas Day, 1849, on a farm in Oxford-on-Rideau Township. His father, Henry, was the son of William Bush, a United Empire Loyalist who had arrived in Dundas County around 1790. His mother, Maria Stanley, had immigrated from Ireland. The couple had ten children, and Orlando lived on the family homestead until 1880, when he began a store in Kemptville. He quickly saw the potential in the growing dairy industry and began a career which saw him own a number of cheese factories around the area, and Orlando Bush was soon a major exporter of cheese to Britain and across the country. The main factory in Orlando’s chain was on the current site of the Kemptville Campus.

Orlando had added politics to his business interests, and served on the Oxford Township Council. He was Reeve of Oxford from 1886 until 1889, and was Warden of the United Counties in 1888.

From local, Orlando moved to provincial politics, and was elected as M.P.P. for Grenville in 1890 as a Conservative. He put a lot of energy into his role in Queen’s Park, sitting as a Member of Standing Committees dealing with Standing Orders, Municipal Laws and, closest to his business interests, the Committees struck to consider an Act to prevent the spread of noxious weeds and diseases affecting fruit trees in 1891, and an Act Providing against frauds in supplying milk to cheese or butter manufacturers in 1892.

He had problems, however. In the 1894 election campaign, his opponents revealed letters showing that Bush had promised to support the Mowat (Liberal) Ministry in return for support in the 1890 election, but had failed to live up to his promise. They also published a U.S. Government record indicating that Bush had actually taken out American citizenship in 1883, and was therefore not an acceptable representative for the people of Ontario. This was rather typical of Ontario political campaigns of the day; but it is certain that Bush was damaged by the revelations.

He resigned his seat in 1898 and moved to Edmonton, Alberta, at the same time as his fellow Baptist, Alexander Rutherford. He farmed and ranched in Clover Bar district east of Strathcona. In 1903, he established a real estate, insurance and loan agency at Strathcona. Orlando ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the House of Commons in 1904. He served on the Strathcona city council from 1908 to 1910 and was also a member of the local school board. In 1908, he married Henryetta Bower after the death of his first wife, Ellen Mundle, a Kemptville native. Bush retired from farming in 1910 and from business in 1911. He served on Edmonton City Council in 1915 and 1917, after Strathcona amalgamated with Edmonton. Orlando died in 1927.

Orlando Bush had successful business and political careers in two provinces, and was one of those Kemptville residents who seem to have moved en masse to Alberta at the turn of the Twentieth Century, and contributed to the development of that part of the North West Territories into a Province in 1905. Building up a successful cheese manufacturing business, serving in municipal and provincial politics, and even being part of an exodus that helped to create a new Province in Canada, Orlando Bush had a full and productive life. Quite a life, for the young farm boy from Taylor Road.

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The Advance Building 206 Prescott Street http://www.ngtimes.ca/the-advance-building-206-prescott-street/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/the-advance-building-206-prescott-street/#respond Fri, 15 Jun 2018 01:55:13 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=13153 Until around 1900, the lots on the west side of Prescott Street south of the Asa Street junction were part of the Anderson & Langstaff company property. Anderson & Langstaff ran an important department store in the large building facing Asa Street. In 1909, the local newspaper, The Advance, which was located where the parking […]

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Until around 1900, the lots on the west side of Prescott Street south of the Asa Street junction were part of the Anderson & Langstaff company property. Anderson & Langstaff ran an important department store in the large building facing Asa Street. In 1909, the local newspaper, The Advance, which was located where the parking lot beside the South Branch Bistro is today, was badly damaged by a fire and were forced to move out of the building. In 1910, the Anderson & Langstaff company built the Advance Building to accommodate the newspaper’s offices. The newspaper rented the building until 1924, when it was bought by the proprietor, John Colborne. Ownership changed hands with the newspaper over the years. Between 1941 and 1950, it was also the location of the Oxford-on-Rideau Egg Association. The upper floor was used by the local Masons for years as a meeting place, and the newspaper shared space with various offices.

The newspaper changed hands many times during the period before it was bought out by Metroland Media, a major Canadian media corporation, and moved out of the building which had been its home for so many years. It no longer has offices in North Grenville. The building continued to be used by Advance Printing, a stationary and printing store, as well as other business through the 200’s, including a candy store and a games centre.

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Union Bank building, Prescott Street, Kemptville http://www.ngtimes.ca/union-bank-building-prescott-street-kemptville/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/union-bank-building-prescott-street-kemptville/#respond Thu, 07 Jun 2018 17:46:52 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=13034 This is now the location of Mr. Mozarella Pizza, but it has a long and colourful history. Kernahan & Wood opened a store along this block of Water Street in 1833. They had a wharf at the end of Thomas Street. Theirs was a general store, also selling their timber products. The building was destroyed […]

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This is now the location of Mr. Mozarella Pizza, but it has a long and colourful history.

Kernahan & Wood opened a store along this block of Water Street in 1833. They had a wharf at the end of Thomas Street. Theirs was a general store, also selling their timber products. The building was destroyed in the 1872 fire. John R. Wallace, a merchant tailor who came from North Gower c. 1888, built the Wallace Block in 1901. It was the office of the Union Bank of Canada and housed the Willis Business College upstairs. The Dominion Department of Agriculture, Dairy Produce Grading Branch was located in these premises in 1935. The work consisted of testing and grading all cheese and butter in the district extending from Brockville to Ottawa to VanKleek Hill. Sam Lecker took over the building in 1948 and ran a store there for 35 years. Later, the Jonquil Tea Rooms were located here, operated by the McGuigan sisters but owned by Lemis Sykes. Patrons entered by the corner door beside which was a large teapot made of flat boards cut to shape, by way of advertisement.

The really interesting story connected with the building in 1924. Mrs. Gauthier arrived for work at around 7.30 that Saturday morning in October, 1924. She worked as a cleaner at the Union Bank, and expected to have a normal shift of sweeping and dusting before the bank opened for business that morning. She was surprised, looking through the manager’s window into the main room of the bank, to see a young man lying on the floor inside the teller’s cage. Being the cautious type, Mrs. Gauthier went outside and called in Howard Jannack, who was just across the street. Howard, too, peered behind the counter, but wouldn’t approach the man on the floor. Instead, the two crossed Water Street to Parkinson’s store and told the manager there, Mr. Swain, what they had seen. Swain was the first to approach the man lying behind the counter. He immediately recognized him as Claude Root, a teller at the bank for the past two years, and someone Swain had chatted to during his dealings with the bank. Swain tried to rouse Root, calling out his name, and then taking hold of his trouser leg and shaking him. He probably thought Root was just fast asleep, but he quickly realized that Claude was not going to wake up again – ever. Looking around, he saw a pistol laying on a chair beside the body.

For the full story, see “The Mysterious Death of a Bank Teller”, in Stories from the South Branch.

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