Regional News – The North Grenville Times http://www.ngtimes.ca The Voice of North Grenville Thu, 11 Jan 2018 14:24:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 Opposition Leader Andrew Scheer visits Brockville http://www.ngtimes.ca/opposition-leader-andrew-scheer-visits-brockville/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/opposition-leader-andrew-scheer-visits-brockville/#respond Wed, 10 Jan 2018 19:30:07 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10470 Members of the public are invited to meet Official Opposition Leader Andrew Scheer when he visits Brockville Saturday, January 20. He will hold an informal “meet and greet” at the Brockville Convention Center from 11 am to 12:30 pm. “The event is free to the public,” explains Leeds-Grenville – Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes Conservative […]

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Members of the public are invited to meet Official Opposition Leader Andrew Scheer when he visits Brockville Saturday, January 20. He will hold an informal “meet and greet” at the Brockville Convention Center from 11 am to 12:30 pm.

“The event is free to the public,” explains Leeds-Grenville – Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes Conservative Association President Michael Barrett. “We just ask the people pre-register so we can make appropriate arrangements.”

Pre-registration can be accomplished on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LGTIRLConservatives, or by email at ScheerEvent@gmail.com.

The Member of Parliament for the riding of Regina—Qu’Appelle in the House of Commons since 2004, Andrew Scheer was Speaker of the House of Commons from 2011-2015 and was elected Leader of the Official Opposition in the spring of 2017.

Joining him will be Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes Member of Parliament Gord Brown.

“I am pleased that our Leader is coming to Brockville so people can meet with him,” says Gord. “It is an opportunity to get to know Scheer in an informal setting,” he notes. “I encourage everyone to join us in welcoming him to the riding.”

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Making Auto Insurance more affordable http://www.ngtimes.ca/making-auto-insurance-affordable/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/making-auto-insurance-affordable/#respond Wed, 13 Dec 2017 19:52:53 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10203 Ontario is taking action to make auto insurance more affordable for the province’s nearly 10 million drivers by introducing the Fair Auto Insurance Plan. The plan includes significant reforms that will address fraud in the system, put victims first by providing better access to care for those injured in auto collisions and strengthen consumer protection. […]

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Ontario is taking action to make auto insurance more affordable for the province’s nearly 10 million drivers by introducing the Fair Auto Insurance Plan. The plan includes significant reforms that will address fraud in the system, put victims first by providing better access to care for those injured in auto collisions and strengthen consumer protection.

The plan is based on recommendations made by David Marshall, Ontario’s advisor on auto insurance. David Marshall is a former president and CEO of the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board. He is also an advisor to the government on pensions.

In a report released in April, 2017, he urged transformative changes aimed at improving the care received by people hurt in collisions, reducing disputes around diagnosis and treatment — and promoting innovation, competition and other steps to improve consumer protection. With the Fair Auto Insurance Plan, the government is moving forward with significant structural reforms to address issues identified by Mr. Marshall, and an ongoing implementation strategy.

Highlights of the plan include: implementing standard treatment plans for common collision injuries such as sprains, strains and whiplash to help people receive the treatment they need after an accident, changing the emphasis from cash payouts to ensuring appropriate care for victims. It also reduces diagnosis and treatment disputes between insurance companies and people injured in collisions by instituting independent examination centres to assess more serious auto collision injuries. Cracking down on fraud will be encouraged by launching the province’s first Serious Fraud Office in spring 2018. The office will use an integrated and dedicated approach to combat serious fraud, with a focus on auto insurance fraud, which has been identified as one of the factors contributing to higher premiums.

The Plan also directs the Financial Services Commission of Ontario (FSCO) to review risk factors used by insurers to calculate premiums with the goal of ensuring drivers in certain parts of the province are not subject to unfairly high rates. It ensures that lawyers’ contingency fees are fair, reasonable and more transparent. The province will establish a panel to guide the enactment of reforms contained in the Fair Auto Insurance Plan.

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An equal digital playing field http://www.ngtimes.ca/equal-digital-playing-field/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/equal-digital-playing-field/#respond Wed, 13 Dec 2017 19:12:31 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10211 Rural Ontario often appears to be an afterthought for the provincial government when it comes to things like infrastructure spending. This is nothing new to anyone who has lived in rural Eastern Ontario. However, there’s a more recent type of infrastructure that’s becoming ever more and more critical, and it’s even completely non-existent in some […]

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Rural Ontario often appears to be an afterthought for the provincial government when it comes to things like infrastructure spending. This is nothing new to anyone who has lived in rural Eastern Ontario. However, there’s a more recent type of infrastructure that’s becoming ever more and more critical, and it’s even completely non-existent in some rural areas. That infrastructure is broadband (high-speed) internet service.

When most people think of infrastructure, they usually think of roads, bridges, and water resource systems, etc. One could argue that broadband has become just as important and that governments should be investing significant amounts of money in it as well. You may be thinking that cities and towns are already serviced by private internet providers of all shapes and sizes, from Bell to Joe Computer, so why does government need to spend tax dollars on this? Unfortunately, a business case can’t be made for private companies to install fibre optics networks (which carry broadband) in rural areas, where there may be sparse populations and significant distances between customers. However, just because private enterprise won’t do it, doesn’t mean that there’s still not a very serious need for it.

There are many reasons why it’s important to invest in broadband for rural areas. From making it difficult to sell a house or property because of no high-speed internet, to reducing agricultural technology options for farms and agricultural businesses that could dramatically help them improve efficiency and reduce costs. Due to the fact that the internet has become so important in so many aspects of our lives, it stands to reason that a lack of broadband could contribute to the demise of some rural communities, because they will become less desirable to live, work, and operate a business in over time. We’re already losing family farms, as some members of the next generation choose a different career and life path. We need to attract people to the rural areas and encourage them to begin farming and start their own businesses. That would be very difficult to do without high-speed internet.

With the rapid advancement of technology, a whole new industrial revolution is believed to be taking place (called “Industry 4.0” according to BDC Economist Pierre Cleroux). This means that, with broadband internet service, small to mid-size businesses could potentially consider non-traditional (rural) areas to invest in, because of the relatively low price of land. Plainly, this won’t happen without broadband service, which has become an absolute must-have in the business world. In other words, rural Ontario is being left behind and is at a serious disadvantage in trying to attract investment and cultivate economic growth. It is challenging enough these days for rural areas, but when you can’t access essential services like high-speed internet, it makes it incredibly difficult to create jobs and encourage residential growth.

There are areas of North Grenville that currently don’t have high-speed internet. Knowing how important this is to economic and residential development, you would think it would be one of the key topics of conversation at the council table both at the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville, and in North Grenville itself. Sadly, that does not appear to be the case. Without it, the economic advantage that the larger urban areas enjoy will only continue to grow and the rural areas will be further left behind.

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New technology identifies seniors at risk of falling http://www.ngtimes.ca/new-technology-identifies-seniors-risk-falling/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/new-technology-identifies-seniors-risk-falling/#respond Wed, 06 Dec 2017 19:37:53 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10082 The Champlain Health Integration Network [LHIN], in partnership with GE Healthcare Canada, has launched a new screening tool to reduce the rate of falls among seniors. The project, supported by Ontario’s Health Technologies Fund, will also provide valuable data to assist healthcare teams in developing effective falls prevention strategies for the future. Falls are a […]

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The Champlain Health Integration Network [LHIN], in partnership with GE Healthcare Canada, has launched a new screening tool to reduce the rate of falls among seniors. The project, supported by Ontario’s Health Technologies Fund, will also provide valuable data to assist healthcare teams in developing effective falls prevention strategies for the future.
Falls are a leading cause of injury for older adults, resulting in a significant number of emergency room visits and hospitalizations. In fact, more than one in five seniors experience at least one fall each year. Eighty-five per cent of injury-related hospitalizations for seniors are due to falls, and falls account for roughly $55 million in health-related costs in the Champlain region every year.

The Champlain LHIN is divided into sub-districts and North Grenville is in the Western Champlain are, the most western and rural sub-region, which has a population of approximately 140,000 people. Western and Eastern Champlain have the largest proportion of people over 65 years of age.

The new screening tool, developed by GE Healthcare, is called the Quantitative Timed Up and Go (QTUG). Seniors who are screened with the tool wear sensors on their shins over clothing, and their movements are tracked and analyzed. Individuals are asked to get up from a chair, walk three metres, turn around, walk back to the chair and sit down. Scores are produced from the data, measuring a person’s frailty and risk of falling. The project targets independent seniors who aren’t usually screened for falls, identifying those at risk and advising them on strategies to increase their safety.

This is one of 15 projects that received funding in the first round of Ontario’s $20-million Health Technologies Fund. The fund is administered by Ontario Centres of Excellence (OCE) on behalf of the Office of the Chief Health Innovation Strategist (OCHIS).

“The Health Technologies Fund is already having an impact in the health system because of the collaborations it has created between health service providers, health technology innovators and patients,” says William Charnetski, Ontario’s Chief Health Innovation Strategist. “We are finding new ways to solve our greatest challenges by harnessing the power of innovation to provide better care while creating jobs in Ontario.”

The Champlain LHIN’s IMPACTT Centre, which drives innovation in home and community care, is leading the local falls screening project, visiting health provider sites and seniors’ social and wellness activities to offer screening opportunities. With its research partner, the University of Windsor, the IMPACTT Centre will analyze the data collected through the project. Ultimately, the goal of the initiative is to foster the development and implementation of new falls prevention programs that increase safety for seniors.
“Falls are a major reason for deteriorating health among seniors, leading to negative impacts such as hospitalizations and social isolation. That’s why it’s important to raise awareness among seniors and their families about the importance of preventing falls, and why we need innovative strategies, especially at a time when the population is aging,” says Champlain LHIN CEO Chantale LeClerc. “This project fits with the LHIN’s strategic priority of expanding enabling technologies. It also aligns with our vision of healthy people and healthy communities supported by a quality, accessible health system.”

Eric Hoskins, Ontario Minister of Health and Long-Term Care, says, “These digital health projects demonstrate why investment through the Health Technologies Fund is so important. People are more comfortable than ever using digital technology in their everyday lives and they expect the same kind interaction of their health system. With these new tools, health care will become even faster and simpler for patients to use in their homes and communities.”

With a proven track record of delivering programs on behalf of the Ontario government, OCE was selected to deliver the Health Technologies Fund and assist in driving the development of made-in-Ontario healthcare technology while supporting economic growth, co-investing to commercialize innovation and fostering partnerships and collaboration in the health system.

“Healthcare is a priority sector in Ontario and globally, so it makes sense that OCE works with publicly-funded healthcare service providers, patients, academia and industry to find innovative ways to improve patient outcomes and experience by supporting the demonstration of health tech through the Health Technologies Fund,” says Dr. Tom Corr, OCE’s President and CEO.

For more information, please visit the Health Technologies Fund website.

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Canada’s species at risk continues to grow http://www.ngtimes.ca/canadas-species-risk-continues-grow/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/canadas-species-risk-continues-grow/#respond Wed, 06 Dec 2017 19:20:46 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10126 by Mario Toneguzzi The number of species at risk of extinction in Canada has risen to an alarming level and officials are meeting in Kananaskis, Alberta to plot a strategy to combat the increasing problem. Rick Bates, Executive Vice-President and CEO, Canadian Wildlife Federation, said there are about 700 species at risk in the country […]

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by Mario Toneguzzi

The number of species at risk of extinction in Canada has risen to an alarming level and officials are meeting in Kananaskis, Alberta to plot a strategy to combat the increasing problem.

Rick Bates, Executive Vice-President and CEO, Canadian Wildlife Federation, said there are about 700 species at risk in the country ranging from iconic ones like the North Atlantic Right Whale and the whooping crane down to turtles and amphibians.

“(The numbers) certainly continue to increase. The things that are driving this are loss of habitat, degraded habitat. For many of these, it’s aquatic habitat,” said Rick. “Their numbers are very low. Their habitat is in decline and the factors that are sort of driving that decline are still active.”

The CWF is calling Canadians to help chart a path forward for innovative actions to ensure abundant wildlife and habitat for future generations. Its 2017 National Conservation Summit, November 28 to December 1, brought together about 175 people with a broad range of perspectives on wildlife including environmental groups, indigenous leaders, hunting and angling organizations, academia, industry and government to seek collaborative action for fish, wildlife, and biodiversity conservation.

“With the recently released statistics about declining wildlife populations and biodiversity, we need to come together to seek solutions,” said Rick Bates. “This is an opportunity for thought leaders from across all sectors to share their ideas and expertise to help shape the future of conservation in Canada. We’re doing a poor job as Canadians of managing our biodiversity and it’s in decline. The things we’ve been doing really as a society haven’t been working”.

The Summit focus was on four critical themes needed to address key conservation challenges such as a changing climate or cumulative impacts across a landscape/seascape. The themes are: thinking bigger and broader; making wildlife and habitat conservation relevant to Canadians; building new partnerships for action on conservation; and establishing new ways of financing conservation.

“We understand that what we’re doing isn’t working. We need to get way, way better as conservation organizations and society. We’re looking at how we can do that. So the four themes are broken into ways we think will help do that,” said Rick. “We need to think differently. We need to develop programs that are bigger scale, more effective at addressing these things. People care about the environment. We know that from all kinds of public surveys but translating that into a decision whether it’s land-use plans or environmental impact processes that sort of public commitment and value is often not well reflected in those formal processes. We’re looking at that and how we can be better.”

Funding is another key initiative. There are gaps where conservation groups don’t partner well with certain sectors of society including the financial community. Also, the gap between what is spent by government and non-government organizations and what is needed to meet the biodiversity strategy for Canada is enormous.

“We’re looking at ways to be creative. How do we bring private financing into conservation?” said Rick. “These are core benefits to society. This is what our economies are based upon. The supply of water. The supply of goods and services that nature provides. This is the fundamental underpinnings of so many of our industries – agriculture, commercial fisheries, forestry, on and on and on. Yet our investment in that as a society is minimal.”

That same week, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada [COSEWIC] was meeting in Ottawa to review the status of Canadian wildlife species that have been identified as potentially being at risk. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the committee. COSEWIC will determine the status of 47 Canadian wildlife species, which include the American Bumble Bee, Fraser River Sockeye Salmon, Peregrine Falcon, Dolphin and Union Caribou and Grey Whale.

The committee is an independent advisory panel to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada that meets twice a year to assess the status of wildlife species at risk of extinction. Members are wildlife biology experts from academia, government, non-governmental organizations and the private sector responsible for designating wildlife species in danger of disappearing from Canada

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For the Love of Music, and I’ll Tell You Why http://www.ngtimes.ca/love-music-ill-tell/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/love-music-ill-tell/#respond Wed, 06 Dec 2017 19:16:54 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10089 by Sean McFadden – Alzheimer Society of Lanark Leeds-Grenville All of us have had lives influenced by music to some degree or another. For some it was a gifted household where everyone shared their talents in music, like singing in a community choir or playing the organ at church. Perhaps our music influences were more […]

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by Sean McFadden –
Alzheimer Society of Lanark Leeds-Grenville

All of us have had lives influenced by music to some degree or another. For some it was a gifted household where everyone shared their talents in music, like singing in a community choir or playing the organ at church. Perhaps our music influences were more focused on a sister singing in the shower or the music in the home simply being played on the family radio in the kitchen. No matter how music came to be part of our lives I think we can all agree that our earliest memories of music were created at a young age, like a mother signing lullabies or a father’s rendition of ‘Take Me Out to the Ball Game’! As we aged, musical memories focused on the song of a first dance at a wedding, motivational music played at a child’s hockey game to sad memories of music played at a loved ones funeral. It’s clear, everyone’s long-term memories hold music and song!

People living with dementia are no different. They’ve had productive, meaningful lives, just like the rest of us. However dementia ‘takes’. It takes our social skills, it takes our communication skills, and it takes our desire to get involved with life and the lives of those we love. It takes our ability to start and get going on a daily basis, and it takes our short term memories. What it will not ‘take’, that is so infused with emotion, happiness and joy – our music. For people living with dementia you will find, many times, that their long term musical memories are still good and it’s a wonderful thing!

So why isn’t music ‘taken’ when a person lives with dementia? Studies have shown that music is stored in a part of the brain that is largely unaffected by memory loss caused by dementia. A group of Dartmouth College researchers has learned that the brain’s auditory cortex (the music memory centre) is the part of the brain that handles information from your ears. This cortex is located just inside the ear, and is usually one of the last places to be affected by dementia. Research has also shown us that the auditory system of the brain is the first to fully function at 16 weeks, which means that you are musically receptive long before anything else. “So it’s a case of first in, last out when it comes to a dementia-type breakdown of memory.” states professor Paul Robertson, a concert violinist and academic who has studied music in dementia care. This helps us understand that “rhythmic and other well-rehearsed responses (clapping, tapping your toe, dancing) require little to no cognitive or mental processing,” states the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America. We didn’t have to learn this! Our ability to appreciate music does not require cognition: it was always there, free to enjoy at any time.

“Since the auditory cortex is usually unaffected, it can actually allow people to tap into the present moment in a way they have little other opportunities to,” states Scott Lundius, education director at the Old Town School of Folk Music. This tapping into the present is an interesting thought. People with dementia largely live in the past, where their long term memories are vibrant and clear. They have very few opportunities, or abilities, to live in the present as dementia progresses. Thus, the logical conclusion to an accessible life in the present is through our music of the past. So what benefits can we hope to gain with this new life in the present?

An article in Alzheimer’s News Today by Wendy Henderson is an excellent source when looking for the benefits to be had for people living with dementia through music. Wendy points out areas where benefits can be found. Music helps to bring back memories and emotions. Everyone has favorite songs that remind them of special times in their lives. Ability to listen to, and enjoy, music is one of the last remaining cognitive skills. When other cognitive skills have declined, the aptitude to appreciate music remains. Music can help Alzheimer’s patients reconnect with their loved ones. Because music can evoke such positive emotions, it can help people share moments of joy with their loved ones.

Singing helps to engage the brain. The right side of the brain is used to listen to music, but to sing along requires the left side of the brain to become engaged. Music can help manage stress and has the ability to lift a person’s mood and make them feel less stressed and agitated. It can be used to set the mood: a fast song can help to raise spirits and make people happy, whereas a slower song can help people to relax and calm down any agitation.

The Alzheimer Society of Lanark Leeds Grenville has several opportunities to get involved. Our groups bring in live music, giving the opportunity to sing along or dance. Our iPods for Memories program caters to an individual’s specific musical taste, we also support several local area musical teas that offer a safe, caring atmosphere to enjoy music. Music is everywhere! Other local agencies promote music programs and almost all churches incorporate music into weekly services.

I once noticed a participant at a musical tea turn to her husband in the middle of “Cheek to Cheek” by Irving Berlin, she lit up and exclaimed “this is what I love”. I think that moment for me is cemented in my long term memory, and I’m lucky to have it. Folks, we are all in this together! Dementia affects us all. It is important to make music available to people we know living with dementia, allowing them the opportunity to enjoy life. So let’s turn on the music and enjoy life. Please drop us a line at the Alzheimer Society and we will help guide and support you as you get involved through music. alz@storm.ca, or call 613-264-0307 or 1-800-511-1911.

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DOCS & DIAMONDS GALA a record-breaker http://www.ngtimes.ca/docs-diamonds-gala-record-breaker/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/docs-diamonds-gala-record-breaker/#respond Wed, 06 Dec 2017 19:16:22 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10077 The United Way’s 2017 Docs & Diamonds Gala was held recently at the Memorial Centre in Brockville and was one for the United Leeds & Grenville record books. The Soprano-themed event raised just over $30,000! A whopping 76% increase over the event held in 2016. This success means that the United Way is closer than […]

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The United Way’s 2017 Docs & Diamonds Gala was held recently at the Memorial Centre in Brockville and was one for the United Leeds & Grenville record books. The Soprano-themed event raised just over $30,000! A whopping 76% increase over the event held in 2016. This success means that the United Way is closer than ever to meeting its $825,000 fundraising goal for this year. These dollars mean so much, and will go to help those in need in the Leeds & Grenville community.

Chair of the Event Committee, Dr. Andy Jordan, said, “I was very pleased with the event and the dollars raised. I feel Docs & Diamonds has established itself as a fun annual event that attendees look forward to each year, and we are already contemplating the 2018 event. The theme is not yet determined, but will continue to be a popular parody of a favourite TV show.”

Trish Buote, Executive Director United Way Leeds & Grenville said, “I am thrilled with the outcome of the event, and so grateful for the generous guests who attended, our important sponsors, and the amazing volunteers and staff who spent countless hours to pull this fun event together. The people who will benefit most are those who are truly in need in our community. I am incredibly thankful.”

There is still time to donate to this year’s campaign. Please visit uwlg.org and donate online or call the office at 613-342-8889. Any help would be gratefully appreciated.

United Way Leeds & Grenville is a non-profit agency that supports 20 local partner agencies in the community. Its mission is to improve lives and build community by engaging individuals and mobilizing collective action. UWLG is dedicated to bringing people together to build vibrant and caring communities. For more information, please visit www.uwlg.org.

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Lower Nicholsons and Black Rapids wharves renovations http://www.ngtimes.ca/lower-nicholsons-black-rapids-wharves-renovations/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/lower-nicholsons-black-rapids-wharves-renovations/#respond Wed, 06 Dec 2017 18:29:41 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=10073 Wharf Replacement work is to begin on these Rideau Canal National Historic Site locations. In December 2017, Parks Canada will begin work on the replacement of the Black Rapids and Lower Nicholsons Wharves. These projects are expected to be completed in spring 2018. Sites like Black Rapids and Lower Nicholsons are popular locations for Canadians […]

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Wharf Replacement work is to begin on these Rideau Canal National Historic Site locations. In December 2017, Parks Canada will begin work on the replacement of the Black Rapids and Lower Nicholsons Wharves. These projects are expected to be completed in spring 2018.

Sites like Black Rapids and Lower Nicholsons are popular locations for Canadians and other visitors to stop and enjoy the natural and built beauty. Parks Canada is undertaking these repairs to ensure that future generations have the opportunity to explore and experience these charming historic sites.

These projects are part of Parks Canada’s unprecedented $3 billion dollar investment to support infrastructure work to heritage, visitor, waterway and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas across Canada. These investments represent the largest federal infrastructure plan in the 105-year history of Parks Canada.

In the mid-1820s Colonel By made plans to construct a dam, lock and embankment at Nicholson’s Rapids. The plan had the dam bypass the rapids with a canal cut along the east bank. Work was completed by contractor H.C. Steven and Co. who worked diligently on the canal cut and lock construction. Local stone from Clowes’ Quarry was used to build the locks and dam. In 1838, an 8m x 8m stone lockmaster’s house was completed. Sometime between 1914 and 1930 a framed second storey was added to the house. In 1912 the upper wing wall, piers and sill of Lower Nicholson lock were reconstructed.

For up-to-date news on infrastructure work along the Rideau Canal, please visit our website: www.pc.gc.ca/rcInfrastructure. If you would like to be added to our community engagement list and receive updates on this project, please e-mail RideauCanal.info@pc.gc.ca and include “Black Rapids and Lower Nicholsons Wharves” in the subject heading.

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North Grenville receives EODP funding http://www.ngtimes.ca/north-grenville-receives-eodp-funding/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/north-grenville-receives-eodp-funding/#respond Wed, 29 Nov 2017 19:59:58 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9932 Kemptville Campus will receive $84,900 for redevelopment through the Eastern Ontario Development Program’s (EODP) Community Innovation projects stream. The announcement was made by Grenville Community Futures Development Corporation’s Executive Director Heather Lawless at the Economic Development Summit held at the North Grenville Municipal Centre recently. “This investment in the Municipality of North Grenville will assist […]

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Kemptville Campus will receive $84,900 for redevelopment through the Eastern Ontario Development Program’s (EODP) Community Innovation projects stream. The announcement was made by Grenville Community Futures Development Corporation’s Executive Director Heather Lawless at the Economic Development Summit held at the North Grenville Municipal Centre recently.

“This investment in the Municipality of North Grenville will assist in repurposing a significant community asset, increasing community capacity for business development and positioning the community for economic diversification activities,” said GCFDC Chair Chris McCorkell.

The funding is pending completion on the sale of the former Kemptville College Campus to the Municipality of North Grenville from the Agricultural Research Institute of Ontario, a provincial agency of the Ontario government. Once the sale is complete, the money will help to transform Kemptville Campus into a multi-tenant, education and community hub focusing on three pillars: education and training, health and wellness, and economic development.

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9th Leeds Grenville Economic Development Summit http://www.ngtimes.ca/9th-leeds-grenville-economic-development-summit/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/9th-leeds-grenville-economic-development-summit/#respond Wed, 29 Nov 2017 19:51:38 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9962 For the second year in a row, the annual Leeds Grenville Economic Development Summit had a sell-out crowd. Over 200 business leaders, not-for-profit organizations and government representatives from throughout the area and neighbouring counties filled the North Grenville Municipal Centre hall for the 9th annual summit focusing on “Collaborating in a Global Marketplace.” The arrival […]

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For the second year in a row, the annual Leeds Grenville Economic Development Summit had a sell-out crowd. Over 200 business leaders, not-for-profit organizations and government representatives from throughout the area and neighbouring counties filled the North Grenville Municipal Centre hall for the 9th annual summit focusing on “Collaborating in a Global Marketplace.”

The arrival of the fourth industrial revolution, known as Industry 4.0, was the hot topic from keynote speaker Pierre Cléroux, Vice President and Chief Economist with the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC). Mr. Cléroux discussed whether Canadian entrepreneurs are ready and if not, what they should do to prepare.

“While Canada is off to a good start, only 3% of Canadian entrepreneurs have fully implemented Industry 4.0 into their business at a time when competitors in the U.S., Europe and Asia are moving full steam ahead,” Mr. Cléroux told the capacity crowd.
“Industry 4.0 allows manufacturers to improve their efficiency, create more personalized products and react more quickly to customer needs than ever before,” he said while unveiling a study on digital technologies transforming the manufacturing landscape.

Another top speaker was Carey Bidtnes, of the Kingston Economic Development Corporation. She outlined the Feihe International Inc. Canadian Project, a major $225-million investment to produce infant formula in Kingston while providing opportunities to related sectors throughout Eastern Ontario.

The yearly summit is hosted by the Leeds Grenville Economic Development Department in partnership with Gord Brown, MP Leeds-Grenville, 1000 Islands and Rideau Lakes, Steve Clark, MPP for Leeds-Grenville, along with the 1000 Islands, Valley Heartland and Grenville Community Futures Development Corporations and the 1000 Islands Region Workforce Development Board.

Featured speaker Huy Thai, of the Ontario Investment Office with the Ministry of Economic Development and Growth, discussed being investment ready and how to secure new investment projects. Ellen Barton, Human Resource Leader with Procter & Gamble, and Robert Nolan, Brockville’s Director of Economic Development, presented on how they are working on reducing the impact of the plant’s closure in 2020.

Brian Carré, North Grenville’s CAO, and Édith Dumont, of the Eastern Ontario French Public School Board, gave an update on the Kemptville Campus and its new partnership.

“Leeds Grenville business and community members should be proud of the work they have done to create a diverse economy that is resilient,” said Ann Weir, Economic Development Manager with the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville and master of ceremonies of the event. We must evolve and continue to position ourselves in the global marketplace where we are seeing the implementation of digital technologies to gain efficiencies and competitiveness. The new Giant Tiger Distribution Centre is a great example of a business doing just that,” Ms. Weir said.

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