Remembrance day – The North Grenville Times http://www.ngtimes.ca The Voice of North Grenville Sun, 22 Apr 2018 15:09:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 Remembrance Day, 11 November, 2017 http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-11-november-2017/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-11-november-2017/#respond Wed, 22 Nov 2017 19:12:55 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9833 by John Baldwin Gathered at the Kemptville Cenotaph, on a beautiful, sunny and windless November 11th day, The representatives of all the various religions encouraged us, to remember our Lord and to pray, The marchers had stopped their marching and the musicians had put their instruments to rest, When a flock of pigeons rose up […]

The post Remembrance Day, 11 November, 2017 appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
by John Baldwin

Gathered at the Kemptville Cenotaph, on a beautiful, sunny and windless November 11th day,
The representatives of all the various religions encouraged us, to remember our Lord and to pray,
The marchers had stopped their marching and the musicians had put their instruments to rest,
When a flock of pigeons rose up into the sky, as if on their own peaceful quest.

Their wings flapped in unison, and, above the scene below, hardly made a sound,
As the trumpeter blew “The Last Post” loudly and it echoed all around!

Heads were bowed in silence, as we remembered those who, in all the wars, had died,
And for many it was a short time to think about what had taken place, – their own thoughts deep inside.

These were soon dispersed, as “The Reveille”, roused them and they awoke,
But not, as many of those; who they were remembering did; to guns, noise and smoke!

For us the sun was still shining, for the laying of the wreathes and right until the last,
When the bands reformed and the parade, made its final salute and “March-Past”,
It was only when the crowd had almost departed and dispersed,
That the flock of pigeons re-appeared, as if they had rehearsed!

And, as one, came in to land, with wings outstretched, down on to the ground,
To their own little part of Kemptville, where, now, thanks to the sacrifice of others, peace does abound.

We will remember them!

The post Remembrance Day, 11 November, 2017 appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-11-november-2017/feed/ 0
Remembrance day in Merrickville http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-merrickville/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-merrickville/#respond Wed, 15 Nov 2017 19:32:01 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9704 The post Remembrance day in Merrickville appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>

The post Remembrance day in Merrickville appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-merrickville/feed/ 0
Remembrance Day at Bayfield Manor http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-bayfield-manor/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-bayfield-manor/#respond Wed, 15 Nov 2017 19:13:32 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9646 On November 10, Bayfield Manor hosted a special Remembrance day with members from the Sea Cadets, Legion and Fire Department in attendance.

The post Remembrance Day at Bayfield Manor appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
On November 10, Bayfield Manor hosted a special Remembrance day with members from the Sea Cadets, Legion and Fire Department in attendance.

The post Remembrance Day at Bayfield Manor appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-bayfield-manor/feed/ 0
Remembrance Day in Kemptville http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-kemptville/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-kemptville/#respond Wed, 15 Nov 2017 19:08:50 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9697 The post Remembrance Day in Kemptville appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>

The post Remembrance Day in Kemptville appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-kemptville/feed/ 0
The Green Fields of France http://www.ngtimes.ca/green-fields-france/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/green-fields-france/#respond Wed, 15 Nov 2017 14:17:01 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9717 “The Green Fields of France” by Eric Bogle Sung by David Shanahan

The post The Green Fields of France appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
“The Green Fields of France” by Eric Bogle

Sung by David Shanahan

The post The Green Fields of France appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
http://www.ngtimes.ca/green-fields-france/feed/ 0
A year of death and division http://www.ngtimes.ca/year-death-division/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/year-death-division/#respond Wed, 08 Nov 2017 19:57:36 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9518 This is our annual Remembrance Day issue, and we have, naturally, concentrated on the year of 1917, one hundred years ago, and a pivotal year in world history. The United States became involved in the affairs of the Old World for the first (but not the last) time. The Russian Empire collapsed and the Romanov […]

The post A year of death and division appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
This is our annual Remembrance Day issue, and we have, naturally, concentrated on the year of 1917, one hundred years ago, and a pivotal year in world history. The United States became involved in the affairs of the Old World for the first (but not the last) time. The Russian Empire collapsed and the Romanov regime ended in slaughter and Bolshevism. But this issue was much harder to put together than others, I found, because it simply made me angry, frustrated and deeply sad, as I learned about the ten men from North Grenville, including two brothers, and the fourteen men from Merrickville-Wolford, including two sets of brothers, who were killed in 1917.

How, I have to ask, did these farmers, blacksmiths and clerks from Asa Street, Merrickville, and Oxford Mills come to die in the obscene mud and slaughter of World War One? What had they to do with the quarrels of Empires, and the family rivalries of the cousins who ruled Germany, Russia and Britain? Canada did not even choose to enter the war, as colonies of the British Empire, they were involved as soon as the Empire declared war in 1914. By the end of 1918, more than 60,000 Canadians, more farmers, clerks blacksmiths and labourers, had been lost to their families and communities.

Why? What was the reason they left their homes and fought and died in the horror of Passchendaele, Vimy, Hill 70 and Lens in that dreadful year of 1917? For King and Empire? That was why the Germans died too, and the Russians, and the Turks. The French had no Empire by then, their soldiers died to resist invasion.

A Prince was murdered in 1914. His Empire, the Austro-Hungarian one, declared war on Serbia. Russia then declared war on Austria-Hungary. The German Empire then declared war on Russia. France had a treaty with Russia, so they declared war on Germany. Germany’s war plan required them to invade France through Belgium. Britain had a treaty with Belgium, so the British Empire declared war on the German Empire. The Ottoman Empire got involved on the side of the German and Austro-Hungarian Empires. Simple, isn’t it?

What had all this to do with a blacksmith on Asa Street in Kemptville, or a clerk in the Percival Plow Company in Merrickville? At Vimy Ridge, in just three days in April, at Hill 70, 3,600 Canadians were killed and another 7,000 wounded taking a piece of land. In August, in another three days of fighting, about 9,000 Canadians were killed or wounded in the overall battle, while an estimated 25,000 Germans were killed or wounded. The Canadian commander, Arthur Currie, was delighted and called it “a great and wonderful victory. G.H.Q. regard it as one of the finest performances of the war..” That same month, Canadians were ordered to take the town of Lens. This battle lasted four days, and the official history of the war recorded: “In all the Canadians had suffered almost 4,000 casualties from 21-25 August. The corps had not achieved any of its initial objectives and had finally withdrawn from the city”.

Then came Passchendaele. British, Australian and new Zealand armies had been fighting for three months when the Canadians got involved in October and November. The horrors there were unprecedented, even in that obscene war. 15,654 Canadians were killed or wounded.

The British suffered 300,000 casualties, and inflicted around 260,000 on the Germans. The British Prime Minister, David Lloyd George, later admitted: “Passchendaele was indeed one of the greatest disasters of the war… No soldier of any intelligence now defends this senseless campaign.” To add greater insult to overwhelming injury, all the ground taken in that battle was later abandoned, without a fight, in 1918.

Meanwhile, back at home, the country was being deeply divided on the issue of Conscription. Volunteers were not coming forward as quickly as in 1914-16, and the promise not to introduce Conscription was broken, as was the social fabric of the nation. Vicious ethnic insults were being thrown around between French and English Canadians, usually unmerited, as loyalty to the Empire was threatening to overwhelm loyalty to Canada in its 50th year of Confederation. The twenty-four local men who were killed in France and Belgium in 1917 may seem unimportant, compared to the hundreds of thousands killed there that year, or to the 20 million deaths and 21 million wounded in World War I. But they were from here, they were men who fought and died with incredible bravery and honour, not to mention the many others who returned, perhaps unwounded, but certainly not unaffected.

And what was the result of it all? The German, Austrian, Ottoman and Russian Empires were gone. The British Empire was almost reduced to bankruptcy and only lasted another twenty-five years. It was already breaking up with the departure of most of Ireland in 1921: the rights of one small nation finally winning out. France and Belgium were devastated. Towns like Vimy, Lens and Passchendaele had been wiped off the map by British and Canadian artillery. Germany was in turmoil, leading to the rise of Hitler. Russia was in turmoil, leading to the rise of Stalin.

We must remember all of this on Remembrance Day, and vow it will never happen again. But it did, over and over. Remembering may not be enough.

The post A year of death and division appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
http://www.ngtimes.ca/year-death-division/feed/ 0
Representatives of South Korean Embassy to visit Merrickville http://www.ngtimes.ca/representatives-south-korean-embassy-visit-merrickville/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/representatives-south-korean-embassy-visit-merrickville/#respond Wed, 08 Nov 2017 19:14:57 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=9539 Members of the South Korean Embassy will play a role in Remembrance Day in Merrickville this month as part of their effort to get to know more small towns in Canada. The Embassy contacted the Merrickville and District Chamber of Commerce in October, expressing interest in paying a visit to the Village. The South Korean […]

The post Representatives of South Korean Embassy to visit Merrickville appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
Members of the South Korean Embassy will play a role in Remembrance Day in Merrickville this month as part of their effort to get to know more small towns in Canada. The Embassy contacted the Merrickville and District Chamber of Commerce in October, expressing interest in paying a visit to the Village. The South Korean Embassy picks one small town in Canada every year to visit, and this year the honour has fallen to Merrickville.

After correspondence with Chamber of Commerce President, Karl Feige, and the Legion, it was decided that representatives from the Embassy will be marching in the parade and laying a wreath at the cenotaph on November 11. President of the Legion, Lee Horning, says this is the first time there will be a representative from another country at the Remembrance Day ceremonies in Merrickville. The main representative from the Embassy will be Jang Hoi Kim Lee, who is the Consul General of South Korea. “There is a Korean War plaque at the Cenotaph and we lay a wreath for it every year,” he says. “I think it will be very good.”

After the parade and wreath-laying, everyone will be invited back to the Legion for a potluck lunch and speeches. MP Gord Brown and MPP Steve Clark will be stopping by at 1 pm to show their support.

Remembrance Day is not the only occasion when members from the South Korean Embassy will be in Merrickville. November 16 will be Korea Day in Merrickville-Wolford, with South Korean representatives making presentations and visiting with members of the business community. The Embassy will be making two presentations to the youth in Merrickville about South Korea, one to the elementary schools (Merrickville Public School and Saint Marguerite Bourgeoys) and another to Fulford Preparatory College. Karl Feige has asked that the Municipality sponsor a lunch for the dignitaries and local business owners and, in the evening, he hopes to organize a reception, complete with traditional Korean food and drink.

“It is a bit of an honour to be chosen by them,” Karl says. “It’s important for us, because we are in the tourism industry, and what they take away from their visit is going to be logged and shared.”

The promise of the South Korean visit has prompted all sorts of Korean connections to pop out of the woodwork. Karl says Fulford Preparatory College has at least one student a year from South Korea, and some teachers also have a Korean connection. Many people don’t know this, but Canada has a free trade agreement with South Korea that took effect on January 1, 2015. Vichos Honey, which has been a hot topic in this paper recently, exports their honey to South Korea and has undoubtedly benefitted from this agreement, which was estimated to increase Canadian exports to South Korea by 32% and boost Canada’s economy by $1.7 billion.

Welcoming a South Korean presence in Merrickville-Wolford is yet another opportunity for the community to play a role on the world stage. Karl says that, with European leisure boating company Le Boat coming to the area in the spring, any exposure that the Municipality can have in countries around the world will bode well for increasing tourism and make Merrrickville-Wolford an even more popular destination.

The post Representatives of South Korean Embassy to visit Merrickville appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
http://www.ngtimes.ca/representatives-south-korean-embassy-visit-merrickville/feed/ 0
Merrickville-Wolford remembers http://www.ngtimes.ca/merrickville-wolford-remembers/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/merrickville-wolford-remembers/#respond Wed, 16 Nov 2016 19:18:35 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=2775 The Village of Merrickville-Wolford remembered the fallen at their annual Remembrance Day ceremony at the Cenotaph on Friday morning. The howling wind and chill in the air didn’t stop members of the Legion, Merrickville-Wolford Council, and kids from the Scouts and Girl Guides of Canada from marching from the Legion to the Cenotaph on St. […]

The post Merrickville-Wolford remembers appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
The Village of Merrickville-Wolford remembered the fallen at their annual Remembrance Day ceremony at the Cenotaph on Friday morning.

The howling wind and chill in the air didn’t stop members of the Legion, Merrickville-Wolford Council, and kids from the Scouts and Girl Guides of Canada from marching from the Legion to the Cenotaph on St. Lawrence Street, accompanied by the traditional sound of the bagpipes.

A large group of people surrounded the cenotaph, awaiting the arrival of the parade and the start of the ceremony. Along with the traditional playing of the last post and moment of silence, there was a scripture reading and several prayers by the leaders of the various churches in the community. A prayer was said for the Queen, the fallen, for our country, and peace.

The most moving part of the morning was the wreath-laying, where members of the community had the opportunity to lay a wreath in honour of a fallen loved one. Service groups, local businesses, families and schools laid their wreaths, pausing for a moment to remember those they had chosen to honour. At the end of the ceremony, people were encouraged to add their poppies to an empty wreath by the podium as their own gesture of remembrance and respect.

After the ceremony, the Legion invited everyone to a pot luck lunch and also supplied hot dogs and much-needed hot chocolate for the kids at the community centre.

The post Merrickville-Wolford remembers appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
http://www.ngtimes.ca/merrickville-wolford-remembers/feed/ 0
Remembering Blake http://www.ngtimes.ca/essay/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/essay/#respond Thu, 05 May 2016 00:24:30 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=1757 My name is Wesley Finner.  I’m a ten-year-old boy from Kemptville, Ontario. This Remembrance Day a lot of people will go to ceremonies to honour our soldiers that have died in past wars.  In my community we lost a solider named Blake Williamson in Afghanistan. I didn’t know much about Blake, but I wanted to […]

The post Remembering Blake appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
My name is Wesley Finner.  I’m a ten-year-old boy from Kemptville, Ontario. This Remembrance Day a lot of people will go to ceremonies to honour our soldiers that have died in past wars.  In my community we lost a solider named Blake Williamson in Afghanistan. I didn’t know much about Blake, but I wanted to learn more.  I decided to talk to one of Blake’s best friends, Cory Wilson and I’ll share what I leaned with you.

Cory described his friend as funny, smart, and charismatic.  Blake always loved to hang out with his friends.  Whether they were meeting for coffee or going to a party, Blake was always fun to be around.  Blake didn’t have to join the army, but he chose to because he always wanted to help his country.  He was killed when Taliban fighters ambushed him in Kandahar province on October 14, 2006.  Our soldiers were trying to build a road for the people but they were attacked.  Blake’s funeral was held in Ottawa. It was very sad. His mom was presented with the Canadian flag that the army had draped over Blake’s coffin. Five hundred people showed up to Blake’s funeral!  At the very end of the funeral his mom’s last words were, “I love you son.”  Cory, has a tattoo on his chest of Blake in his uniform. This is because he wants to honor his friend for his great sacrifice.

What Blake did for our country and what all the other soldiers do is unbelievable. They are heroes for going to war knowing they may give their lives to save ours!  We should remember Blake and the rest of the soldiers that died in war by telling stories and going to ceremonies on Remembrance Day. Lest we forget.

The post Remembering Blake appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
http://www.ngtimes.ca/essay/feed/ 0
Remembrance Day Literary winner http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-literary-winner/ http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-literary-winner/#respond Thu, 05 May 2016 00:19:31 +0000 http://www.ngtimes.ca/?p=1754 Every year, the Royal Canadian Legion holds two competitions in connection with Remembrance Day in Canada. One is a poster competition, and the other challenges contestants to “exercise their creativity and write an essay and/or poem on the theme of Remembrance. This is a contest to select the most suitable essays and poems submitted by […]

The post Remembrance Day Literary winner appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
Every year, the Royal Canadian Legion holds two competitions in connection with Remembrance Day in Canada. One is a poster competition, and the other challenges contestants to “exercise their creativity and write an essay and/or poem on the theme of Remembrance. This is a contest to select the most suitable essays and poems submitted by students in the Canadian school system”.

Local student Wesley Finner entered the Legion’s Remembrance Day Literary contest this past fall. He researched Kemptville’s own Blake Williamson who, sadly, was killed in Afghanistan in 2006. Wesley interviewed one of Blake’s best friends to find out as much as he could and then wrote and submitted his essay. He has been very keen on writing, especially encouraged by his teacher Sherri Sawinski. He entered the Junior Literary Contest, competing against other students in Grades 4, 5, and 6.

Wesley won the local contest at Branch 212 in Kemptville; he then advanced and won the Legion Zone Competition. Next, his essay won the provincial competition, and finally to his great surprise, he won first place in the national contest as well.

Kemptville’s Branch 212 recently invited Wesley and his family to their annual awards dinner to celebrate his achievement. Legion member Ruth Garrett, who heads up the Youth Remembrance Contests, pointed out that Wesley is the first student in branch history to advance this far in the contest. Wesley was overwhelmed when the respected members of the Legion in attendance gave him a standing ovation in recognition of his achievement. He is very excited to learn that his essay will be displayed at the War Museum in Ottawa for one year. The winning entries for the four categories (school grades) are displayed at the Canadian War Museum from July 1 to May 1 of the following year. Wesley’s father, Christopher, who is a History teacher at St. Michael Catholic High School, gave credit to Wesley’s teachers for the encouragement they have given him in his literary development: “Our family is very thankful for the great teachers at Holy Cross who played a major role in Wesley’s success!”

The post Remembrance Day Literary winner appeared first on The North Grenville Times.

]]>
http://www.ngtimes.ca/remembrance-day-literary-winner/feed/ 0